Rabbit nest box bedding materials

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by wyo-helpmeet, Oct 8, 2009.

  1. Pine shavings

    1 vote(s)
    33.3%
  2. Newspaper

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. Hay or straw of some sort

    2 vote(s)
    66.7%
  4. Other

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. wyo-helpmeet

    wyo-helpmeet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 23, 2009
    West TN
    What do you use? Please comment if you choose other.
     
  2. Hoosiermomma

    Hoosiermomma Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 6, 2009
    S.E Ind
    We use a combination of straw and shavings.....shavings under straw.[​IMG]
     
  3. therealsilkiechick

    therealsilkiechick ShowGirl Queen

    Jul 18, 2007
    Northwestern, pa
    we use combo of hay and shavings.
     
  4. wyo-helpmeet

    wyo-helpmeet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 23, 2009
    West TN
    Can I ask why the combo? My girls will be bred in about 6weeks or so, and I want to do the best possible things for them. I was planning on using the shavings, but the lady at the feed store says they're dangerous. I googled & I'm getting mixed reviews. I had planned on using the shavings. She offered me timothy hay, so I can do that, but I was curious of the census. I just thought since I already buy the shavings, it would be easier.
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2009
  5. therealsilkiechick

    therealsilkiechick ShowGirl Queen

    Jul 18, 2007
    Northwestern, pa
    i use pine shaveings mostly. cedar shaveings r toxic to alot of small animals i refuse to use that with any of my animals it maybe why u saw mixed reviews. it mixes with the amonia in the pee and makes it a toxic gas to them. also shaveings don't hold the heat enough for the babies for long periods of time and mom's don't stay on the nests with them like how chickens do.

    most of the year i only use pine but cold months and for nests i use the combo or if i buy the cheaper food when they r out of our normal feed. hay holds the heat in better since it is hollow and the pine absorbs the pee better when put under the hay. it allows for the top of the nest to stay dryer while absorbing stuff down under away from the babies. the hay helps to make the hutches smell better and if i have the cheaper feed i add as a supliment feed also since it is not a complete diet in that brand of pellets.
     
  6. gypsy2621

    gypsy2621 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 29, 2008
    New Hampshire
    Quote:pine shavins are not dangerous as long as they are dried, fresh shaving that havent been kiln dried will be toxic and can kill the babys.

    I have used pine shavings and a field cut hay for nesting material for over 20 years.
    using a timothy based hay such as sold in feed/pet stores is only going to make the mother eat the hay and leave nothin for the babys to snuggle up and keep warm.
     
  7. wyo-helpmeet

    wyo-helpmeet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 23, 2009
    West TN
    Quote:I'm definitely not using cedar. I didn't even put that in the poll because I know better [​IMG] When I googled & spoke to the lady at the feed store I specifically said & searched & read for *pine* shavings.

    THNX for the explanation on the heat & absorption. That is probably what I'll do, esp since we're in zone 4/5 & coming up on winter.
     
  8. wyo-helpmeet

    wyo-helpmeet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 23, 2009
    West TN
    Quote:See that's what *I* thought. I've read Timothy Hay is a treat for them, which was another reason I was planning on doing the pine.

    All in all, I wanted to be sure the pine shavings wouldn't be "dangerous."
     
  9. RabbitMage

    RabbitMage Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 27, 2009
    We've had our babies in pine shavings for the last 9 years, no issues from them except that I'M allergic!

    If you want a potentially 'safer' thought slightly more expensive option, you could use aspen shavings in place of pine.
     
  10. feathersgalore

    feathersgalore Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 4, 2008
    Central Ohio
    We start with straw and once we change the bedding, we switch to hay. This gives the babies something to nibble.
     

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