Raised beds?

Discussion in 'Gardening' started by KDOGG331, May 17, 2017.

  1. KDOGG331

    KDOGG331 Chicken Obsessed

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    So I'm basically new to gardening and am kind of looking for the best/easiest way I guess.

    I was thinking raised beds? My brother's girlfriend's father made them two and they look nice so I thought I could make some too? Theirs are only one board high though, I was thinking two or three? Is this a good way?

    I figured I could just fill it with some soil and compost and plant in it.

    But then I've also seen other ideas like I just found lasagna gardening and composting teas and all this stuff too and I don't really know what any of it means. There's soooo many different gardening methods and everyone always says there's is the best etc. And I always get intimidated and confused. :( and like for example, I found this whole article once about how mulching/hay really wasn't a good idea even though it was popular. Everything seems to contradict everything else. :(

    I'm thinking maybe I should just stick to old fashioned methods for now and just learn how to garden first? Ha

    ANYWAY.

    Will raised beds work?

    Oh and btw, I want to grow vegetables. I already have tomatoes and peppers started and herbs too. The tomatoes and peppers have already way outgrown the tray, I really need to transplant them haha

    And is it too late to start more plants and/or direct sow?

    Sorry, I know this post kind of jumps around a lot but yeah, are raised beds good to grow vegetables in and if yes, what's the best way to go about it/what do I fill it with?
     
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  2. Finnie

    Finnie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Here is a good thread that addresses some different ways of gardening. I think you will find some of these methods easier than traditional "dig a big plot" methods. I can't remember if they address raised beds specifically, but I'm sure if you ask them to compare some of their methods to raised beds, you can get the pros and cons of them.

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/th...ther-non-conventional-garden-methods.1114524/
     
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  3. KDOGG331

    KDOGG331 Chicken Obsessed

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    Thanks a lot! That's really helpful. :)
     
  4. lutherpug

    lutherpug Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This is the first year I branched out from container gardening as we finally fenced in our yard so don't have to worry quite so much about deer, kids, dogs, etc. I put in 2 4x4 raised beds that I divided into 16 1sq ft plots. It's a popular method called "square foot gardening". You might look into it, it is easy for a beginner. I've got 32 crops growing in a small space and I've been really impressed with how easy it has been to maintain. Plus, my veggies are growing! There is a lot of info online about how much of each type of veggie can be planted in a single square foot.

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  5. WVForestGirl

    WVForestGirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think it depends on the soil in the area where you want your garden. Mine is on top of a clay/rock hill so it was a lot easier to make raised beds and bring in good dirt instead of trying to dig down and augment the existing soil. My beds are two boards high with a cap so it's easy to sit on the edge for weeding or stand on it to install high trellises.

    One thing to consider with raised beds is the type of lumber you will use. If you use untreated, it will last only a few years, depending on climate, unless you use cedar or something like that. Treated lumber lasts longer but you have to be sure to line the entire inside and bottom with thick plastic sheeting. Another option might be those plastic (composite?) decking boards but I have no experience with those.

    I bought bags of the cheap garden soil (not the fancy mixed stuff) and mixed in peat moss, sand and compost to start. Now I just add compost every year.
    You can certainly still direct seed things like lettuce, kale, chard, carrots, beans. For things like tomatoes, peppers I would try to find some plants that are close to blooming at this point in the year.

    I mulched with grass one year and got voles living underneath, they would pull my carrots and parsley down into holes when my back was turned, it was like a cartoon. Now I use a drop watering system, does a pretty good job of keeping the weeds down between the plants.
    Have fun!
     
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  6. KDOGG331

    KDOGG331 Chicken Obsessed

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    Wow that sounds like a good method! Thanks
     
  7. KDOGG331

    KDOGG331 Chicken Obsessed

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    Wow thank you so much for all that info WV! It's extremely helpful! :)

    I think our spil is mostly clay but some spots are somewhat sandy
     
  8. KDOGG331

    KDOGG331 Chicken Obsessed

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    NorthTexasWink likes this.
  9. WVForestGirl

    WVForestGirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Those look cool and will be a great for a first try. Good luck!
     
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  10. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    Hey kdogg, last year after I had one knee replaced my husband built me very deep raised beds. So far they are working out wonderfully. I did plant my tomatoes elsewhere otherwise they would be way over my head. I am currently enjoying radish and lots of lettuce. It looks to be a bumper crop year with little effort, always a good thing for me.

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