re homing a rooster

jannali

Hatching
Mar 17, 2020
5
3
8
we started off with a random chicken (Leslie) turning up in our yard, we then got 2 more to keep her company. one morning we were woken by a little silky rooster in our front yard, turned out he was a stray found by someone who didn't have any other chickens so we kept him too. The rooster (Gary) has become increasingly aggressive now towards people, we have a line up of weapons at the back door just to make it to the car alive! He actually chases people who aren't anywhere near the chickens and even jumps up and kicks our security door if you are lucky enough to make it inside before he nails you! we really love watching him taking care of the hens, it's pretty awesome how he protects them. The thing I'm wondering is will little Gary (or our hens) get upset or stressed if we re-home him? We really do love the little character & understand that he's just doing his job, but would rather re-home him if it will not upset him or the hens doing so.
 

hysop

Back from hiatus (11/24/21)
Premium Feather Member
Sep 16, 2019
3,993
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SW Georgia
They will just have to reestablish their pecking order once he’s gone.

If you do decide to sell or give him away do warn his next owners of his behavior so they’re aware and can maybe work with him.

Some people have the time and patience and dedication to work with a rooster, others don’t. I personally don’t.
 

JacinLarkwell

Crossing the Road
Mar 19, 2020
16,100
33,243
861
South-Eastern Montana
I've learned even when warned about behavior, people tend to underestimate aggression. Maybe because they assume if it was actually a mean bird, we would have just culled instead.

But I've stopped offering aggressive males because I'll warn people and then a week later I'm getting contacted because the bird is way meaner than they thought it would be
 

hysop

Back from hiatus (11/24/21)
Premium Feather Member
Sep 16, 2019
3,993
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SW Georgia
I've learned even when warned about behavior, people tend to understatement aggression. Maybe because they assume if it was actually a mean bird, we would have just culled instead.

But I've stopped offering aggressive males because I'll warn people and then a week later I'm getting contacted because the bird is way meaner than they thought it would be

Oh wow 😳 didn’t know people underestimated what mean meant but you’re right.
I personally cull mine.
 

JacinLarkwell

Crossing the Road
Mar 19, 2020
16,100
33,243
861
South-Eastern Montana
Oh wow 😳 didn’t know people underestimated what mean meant but you’re right.
I personally cull mine.
I've even flat out told some that the bird needs to be watched and contained until the pen is closed, or to not let children near them because they won't back down, and they insist it's fine, they just need him for breeding, yada yada.

Apparently not.
 

EmmaRainboe

🙄🤚💙Ameraucana Enthusiast💜
Premium Feather Member
Jul 30, 2020
15,698
146,637
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Washington
I don't think it is fair to pass on the heart ache of having to cull an aggressive bird to someone else. You chose to keep him, it is your job to do what is right. If you give him away especially a silkie people are likely to get attached because of how adorable they are, I personally don't think it is fair to pass that on to someone else. You can choose to keep him, but if he reproduces he can pass on the aggression to his children. I'm sorry if I sound harsh, I know what it is like to be in your position, the heart ache hurts. But I don't think it's fair for someone to also suffer it. :hugs
 

jannali

Hatching
Mar 17, 2020
5
3
8
Don't give an aggressive rooster away. That's not fair to the people taking him in.
yes, I would definitely tell people about his behavior, he would be fine on a farm where people weren't too close to him all the time, it's just hard in our back yard where we can't avoid him.
 

Studabird

Songster
May 8, 2020
222
430
116
Southwest Louisiana
How old is this rooster? I had a cockerel that was just rude! So I had him contained in a coop/run for three months but it started to get too cold for him to be alone and put him in with three five month old pullets and he has been acting like the perfect gentleman so far. Don’t know if this is an option for you but just some food for thought. But it sounds like he may need to be contained rather than free ranged. This way people can move about the backyard freely
 

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