Reintegration by supervised visits ?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by sunflour, Aug 23, 2015.

  1. sunflour

    sunflour Flock Master Premium Member Project Manager

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    @TalkALittle - you are, of course, exactly right about the head hen having a secure position. I lost my top BR, Dottie, recently. But a few months ago she was acutely ill and hid it from the others. Had to move her to sick bay for a few days the first time she became ill and when she was ready to rejoin the flock, just placed her back with them and absolutely no discord. Second time she got ill, she didn't make it. And sadly it was exactly the same time Penny was under the weather and away from the flock. I think their absence changed the expectations of all except the #2 gal Tweedie who easily moved to her new role as leader. The other 2 have had no serious fights but brief pecks and shuffles to access treats. But both are obviously threatened with the reintroduction of Penny & surely don't want her to move up the ladder.


    Would love to be able to attend the chicken workshops, but too far away for me.


    Thanks for your input, any and all suggestions are appreciated.
     
  2. Mutt Farm

    Mutt Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

    @sunflour TY meant thank you. Bingo on the chicken behavior and training info. We use it to hopefully become better positive reinforcement trainers. You can't use collars, leashes and commands on a chicken. As soon as it cools off, (if it ever does) I'm going to set up a little course here. Just for cheap fun.
    @TalkALittle Dr. Yin was a great educator and such an advocate for shelter dogs and behavior training. Her death was a tragedy.
    It is fascinating how the silent ones can keep order with almost un-perceivable language. I watch the chickens by the hour trying to notice what happens right before the obvious action.
     
  3. sunflour

    sunflour Flock Master Premium Member Project Manager

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    Thanks for info Mutt Farm, will add "TY" to my BYC vocabulary.



    Does anyone have any idea of why chickens chatter so much when they are getting on the roost in the evening? Mine chatter before the jump, and even for awhile after everyone is up and in place. It seems most, if not all, of their instinctive behavior are for survival of the flock. It would seem being quiet on the roosts would be more appropriate.
     
  4. Mutt Farm

    Mutt Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

    I have an idea (guesses) Flock preservation: I found a good roosting place and will call others. Eyesight stinks at night, so they'll call the flock in? But they're in and quiet before the predators come out.
    Then there's the instinct of it's safety in #'s: Hey, why don't a bunch of you roost around me just in case?
    Once they're all up and situated, they don't make a sound I think.
    That's my guess.
     
  5. Blooie

    Blooie Team Spina Bifida Premium Member

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    They're just chatting about their day, gossiping about the silly humans who THINK they own them, and telling each other bedtime stories. I also think they're setting the watch - determining whose turn it is to stand guard and who messed up the job last time.
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2015
    deepbluesea likes this.
  6. sunflour

    sunflour Flock Master Premium Member Project Manager

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    Actually my hens chat for about 10-15 minutes after they are actually on the roost. I have thought they may be trying to locate where the early to bed gals are so they can find the best place to jump up?
    I think you are right. Don't you wish we could really understand their chatter?
     
  7. TalkALittle

    TalkALittle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Studies of wild parrots have shown that, even in large flocks, smaller groups of birds will habitually roost together. Each of these roosting groups will have its own particular vocalizations. The vocalizations seem to serve to identify the incoming bird to the birds already roosting and vice versa.

    I know chickens aren't parrots but they are both highly social species so it isn't too much of a stretch to think that they'd share some commonalities.
     
  8. sunflour

    sunflour Flock Master Premium Member Project Manager

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    That is likely the answer.
     
  9. Mutt Farm

    Mutt Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

    I'll buy that.
     
  10. sunflour

    sunflour Flock Master Premium Member Project Manager

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    Making progress [​IMG]

    Lillie seems to be understanding that aggression not only gets a squirt of water , but time out in jail. Instead of locking the bully up first, we let her show some aggression, squirt and into chicken jail immediately without treats or outdoor escapades.

    Today, they were out in the coop/run and in a small outside "range" within 2 feet of each other and no major threats.

    I think we are on the way to a reintegrated flock, but plan to continue sort visitations with spray bottle in hand.
     

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