Rescued farmed chickens help

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by urbanrooster, Dec 19, 2013.

  1. urbanrooster

    urbanrooster New Egg

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    Hey all, I've just got 5 Rhode Island reds chickens from a local farm. I brought them home and soon realized they were very unhealthy. There beeks are deformed missing feathers sneezing or coughing, and there legs and combs are dis coloured. I have them separate from my healthy flock. What can I do to bring them back to good health, and will they recover. I've started to give them vitamin electrolytes in there water, yoghurt and organic mash. I would appreciate any advice support from the pros. Thanks very much in advance. Sean.
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    Welcome to BYC. I would return them and not ask for my money back. Treating chronic respiratory disease is costly, and all of your healthy chickens will be exposed.
     
  3. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress Premium Member

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    If you have a healthy flock, close it to everything but hatching eggs and hatchery day olds.
    There are many things that you can't get rid of even with a quarantine.
     
  4. urbanrooster

    urbanrooster New Egg

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    Taking them back to live in a state of decay is not an option in my opinion. I really like to rehabilitate them.
     
  5. appps

    appps Overrun With Chickens

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    How far away from your existing flock can you keep them? Its nice you want to save them but you need to be careful you don't end up loosing them and your existing flock.
     
  6. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    That is a noble thought, and I can understand you wanting to help them. It is just that if you have healthy chickens already, you are going to infect them even if you the new chickens recover. Most respiratory diseases in chickens are chronic--they are never cured, and even if they no longer appear sick, they are carriers for life. Your old chickens will get sick, and then also become carriers. I am telling you this to help, not to be critical. Here are 2 links that you can read about MG (CRD) and other common diseases--read about MG, coryza, ILT, and infectious bronchitis for symptoms and treatments:
    http://umaine.edu/livestock/poultry/mycoplasma-gallisepticum-faq/
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044
     
  7. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Additionally, even if the new birds are seperated a good distance away from your existing flock, diseases can be transmitted on your clothing, hands, shoes etc...that will be spread to your old flock. Infectious Bronchitis (IB) can even be transmitted airborne a good distance. Implementing strict quarantine with your new birds will be a challenge. Treating birds mask symptoms, they are are never cured from respiratory diseases. I recommend that you cull the birds and incinerate them or deeply bury them.
    You asked for support from knowledgable people; I know it's not what you expected. There are folks in this thread that have been down this road and they know what they're talking about. They are simply looking out for the health, safety, and welfare of your existing flock...not to mention your heartache in the long run. Good luck with whatever you decide.
     
    3 people like this.
  8. chickengeorgeto

    chickengeorgeto Overrun With Chickens

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    dawg53, well said.
     
  9. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2013
  10. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress Premium Member

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    Well said. It would break my heart, but my own chickens would be the ones that are important.
     

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