Folly's place

Enabler
9 Years
Sep 13, 2011
21,278
32,259
1,036
southern Michigan
My understanding is that the OP already has flimsy framing, 3' apart, not 2' on centers. So adding smaller lumber on top doesn't make sense to me.
I'm not a carpenter though!
Mary
 

Panhandler80

Chirping
Feb 11, 2020
322
373
90
NW Florida
My understanding is that the OP already has flimsy framing, 3' apart, not 2' on centers. So adding smaller lumber on top doesn't make sense to me.
I'm not a carpenter though!
Mary
It'll make a tone of difference. Right now the whole system shift very easily. Picture an extension ladder with each rung tacked in with one nail. Will it hold it's shape if left alone? Yep! Now picture what would happen if you picked UP on one side rail and pushed DOWN on the other. Your upward lifting side rail would in fact go up, and your down would go down.

If you have 8 rungs, you have 16 attachment points. Call them A1 and B1... A2 and B2... and so on. If the ladder was laying on a flat surface, when you did the UP / DOWN exercise with the side rails, you effectively moved each A and B point the same distance from each other. Each rung now hits the side rail at say a 75 degree angle (and inverse other side) rather than a 90.

There are only two points attaching each rung to the side rails, and they are all working independent of each other. Very easy to move on rail up, and one rail down.

NOW... lay a member down the middle of the extension ladder and fasten it to each rung. Now you have THREE points on each wrung, which means rather than 7 boxes all easily shifted in the U/D deal because none of the boxes is helping stabilize any other box, you have 14 boxes. In the 14 box scenario on is now a shared member. By conecting the rungs down the middle, you have eliminated the option for U/D movement of the side rails.

When R side rail wants to up, so do the R side of the rungs. But they can't go up because there is a box on the opposite side of the middle member. That box is... I'm over complicating it. Basically... the middle piece in the ladder prevents each of the 7 boxes form acting independently. R side can't go up, because once the rungs are all attached, the left side can't go down.
 

NatJ

Crowing
Mar 20, 2017
3,123
4,658
306
USA

Panhandler80

Chirping
Feb 11, 2020
322
373
90
NW Florida
To the left, very easy for right side rail to go down, and left to go up.

Assume each rung is even hinged to the side rail, in fact.. SUPER easy. Back and forth back and forth. THey are on hinges, after all.

Add a third rail (a purlin.. only the rungs would be rafters, and the side rails would be way farther apart).... the red line in the diagram.

Now, when you apply the same forces, that GREEN circle can't go down. Even if the rungs are still HINGED to the side rails. He can't go down because he's trying to move rungs A, B, C, D, and E. They can't move because the junctures at the yellow circles have made the system one. Rung A is being held up by the first yellow circle, meanwhile it's also having push DOWN on the next yellow circle, and so on.

The purlins basically take one big box (or a ladder in my example) and make a lot of smaller boxes (the solid gray in the lower right crappy image in my diagram).

1597436954595.png
 

docdubz

Chirping
Nov 24, 2016
102
53
94
Central Texas
@docdubz will you add some windows?
Especially a big ones on the monitor sides:
View attachment 2290369
I wasn't planning on it. The front is where you can see the window and the entire back face of the building is entirely open. The way I have going interiorly is each side of the the barn is a coop, they are open to the center and to the rear wall as well as having a ventilation channel so that the heat in the coops rises into the top of the hayloft and the breezeway and top front window create cross ventilation (both openings are pointed directly toward prevailing winds) and the bottom of the barn has a 6" gap between the ground and the plywood. It will be easier to show what I'm talking about once the roof is on, but I believe that ventilation will be more than adequate. And if it turns out that I'm wrong it wouldn't be very hard to open up more ventilation.
 

docdubz

Chirping
Nov 24, 2016
102
53
94
Central Texas
And, for all the recent posts bordering on insults.. This is a barn for chickens, where there is no snow and rarely any sort of wind, not a rocket.
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
7 Years
Nov 27, 2012
84,365
97,867
1,677
SW Michigan
My Coop
I wasn't planning on it. The front is where you can see the window and the entire back face of the building is entirely open. The way I have going interiorly is each side of the the barn is a coop, they are open to the center and to the rear wall as well as having a ventilation channel so that the heat in the coops rises into the top of the hayloft and the breezeway and top front window create cross ventilation (both openings are pointed directly toward prevailing winds) and the bottom of the barn has a 6" gap between the ground and the plywood. It will be easier to show what I'm talking about once the roof is on, but I believe that ventilation will be more than adequate. And if it turns out that I'm wrong it wouldn't be very hard to open up more ventilation.
Will be curious to see when it's done, inside and out.
 

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