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Rooster rescued from a coyote, using Manuka honey

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Sunshine Flock, Oct 11, 2017.

  1. Tlmcq

    Tlmcq Songster

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    Yes plantain is a "weed" that grows all thru yards where I'm at in Ohio. Look it up online it is very easy to identify. It's a native edible with many uses and health benefits to humans and chickens. I've used it several times for my rabbits, chickens, and ducks.
     
  2. Fairview01

    Fairview01 Songster

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    So chickens don't have a diaphragm as we do which fills and empty our lungs. Instead their ribcage expands which creates the negative pressure to fill the lungs. Their respiratory system is quite complicated. If your rooster'a body cavity is punctured he has what is equivalent to a sucking chest wound. When his ribcage expands not only does air try to enter his lungs but it will also enter through the puncture making it harder for him to breathe. If he truely does have a punctured body cavity he would greatly benefit from a few stitches with needle and thread.
     
    Boynedoc and Birdinhand like this.
  3. Sunshine Flock

    Sunshine Flock Crowing

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    Fairview, good to know, thank you. This is most likely what he's experiencing.
     
  4. Sunshine Flock

    Sunshine Flock Crowing

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    The comb points discolored again to a dull blue or gray. I repeated the gentle compression and it's warm again and bright red. I'm not sure this is accomplishing anything for him that's needed or helpful, though.

    He's showing pain on the side with the puncture. The other side I can apply honey with no reaction. And much to my annoyance, I neglected to flip him over and check his underside. I found a wound, not grave like the others. It has a green tinged in-fill, but no smell I could detect. Honey has dripped all over the poor guy, so the wound did end up getting some. I doused it tonight, but a wound under his body, I'm not sure how to address that.

    I keep seeing him sitting in that wooded area where I found him, tucked there while the coyote went back for more. He couldn't move but was upright and alert. It breaks my heart every time I remember him there, my sweet rooster, something of mine, part of my family, taken away from me. I also felt heart broken for the coyote, who just lost a wonderful meal in our months of intense heat and limited food.

    I'm feeling numb and down tonight. This was my fault.
     
  5. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Free Ranging

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    :hugs

    The comb turning blue or gray is usually an indication of decreased oxygen and/or blood flow.

    You mention that the wound underneath is a green tinged "fill-in" - green in chickens is bruising, but I'm not sure what a fill in is:oops:

    Are you opposed to using antibiotics? I don't want to push them on you - he may benefit from treatment of Penicillin. Since you're dealing with a rooster you don't have to worry about egg residue/withdrawal and you don't mention anything about butchering him for meat. Just throwing it out there if you are inclined - most Tractor Supply stores carry Penicillin in their refrigerated section.
     
  6. Fairview01

    Fairview01 Songster

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    I neglected to add this. Was thinking but not typing. When roosters are cut to make capons, a body cavity wound is created but before the incision is made all the loose skin is pulled back to the tail. Then the cut is made to gain access to the testicles. Once removed the skin slides back up to normal position sealing the cut between the ribs. They still have difficulty breathing for a bit until the excess introduced air is absorbed but not like there is a direct and constant opening to atmospheric air pressure.

    I respect you desire to not use modern day antibiotics despite I think you're wrong for not doing so and causing undue pain and suffering to the rooster. Honey because of it anaerobic properties was used to control bacterial infections but natural sulpher quickly replaced it. Just regular old nasty smelling powdered sulpher sprinkled on the wound would be much more effective.

    Lastly the longer an open wound to the body cavity exists, the greater potential and probability airborne bacteria will find a home in there and set up a general infection in the body that will be untreatable. You're doing a great job but as my daughter who is a vet yells me, 'Dad you just don't understand. When any bird is brought into the office its like they make up their mind to die no matter what you try to do for them. That's why there are very few vets willing to treat birds.' At some point you're rooster may just shut down and decide he'd gonna die despite your best efforts.
     
    shepherd6567 likes this.
  7. Sunshine Flock

    Sunshine Flock Crowing

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    Thanks, Fairview. I like that you don't pad anything. I'm learning a lot.

    He's not a meat chicken; he's hen security, and he did a wonderful job saving their lives from the coyote. I've always wondered about that line between milking an animal along that's greatly suffering, versus allowing some space for figuring things out and seeing how they do within a three day period of time.

    Today is the third day. I massaged his cold comb and once again it's been bright red for hours now. Tissue can die when it lacks blood/oxygen (not sure exactly). It doesn't seem to harm him, and it certainly makes me feel better seeing that nice comb all bright and cheery.

    The main change today is he didn't show interest in the cooked egg. He swiped his beak through it and the pumpkin seeds and didn't eat. This was concerning, since he loves egg and seeds, and his appetite was encouraging.

    So I made a mash from his feed, mixed in some seeds, added some dandelion greens from the health food store, unsalted tuna, and he started eating. Not like yesterday, but he's favoring the greens, and at least he's getting some protein.

    He stopped eating when he heard one of his hens. I brought one inside and let her nibble on some of the food on a separate plate with me between Henry and the hen. You have to be careful, because they can be fast and they have power beaks. But she was totally focused on the treats, and Henry noticeably relaxed around her. I think it helped his obvious depression.

    I bought some more Manuka honey, this time at the health food store. I didn't know there are differences. Some are tested and marketed as containing a specific amount of what makes it such powerful medicine. I've been using one from Trader Joe's and never thought to research it. You can also buy "Wound Honey", but it contains two other ingredients I don't feel are necessary, and it's much more expensive when marketed specifically as a healing agent, than just buying a jar of the honey.

    A small amount goes a long way, so don't let cost prohibit you from keeping a jar of this honey on hand as a part of your medicine kit. Also, the Trader Joe's honey looked like normal honey, but the Manuka I bought at the health food store is creamier, which makes it easier to apply.

    Now, as for the green "filled in" wound on Henry's underside, thanks to you guys I learned why it's filled in: it's a dang bruise!! I went to bed feeling a bit defeated last night and woke up hitting myself over the head. This is a learning process. I can't be expected to know everything all at once. But I have to say, my months browsing these forums helped me address different things as they've come up. A while back I read that someone's chickens prefer mash to dry feed. That's how I was able to get Henry to eat today.

    So, once again thank you!

    Pain is another issue. He's showing indications of pain on the side with the puncture. The puncture, I now know, is possibly an air sac or body cavity puncture. I'm not seeing worsening symptoms, and this morning I couldn't even find the opening. It may be healing together and mending. I'm not sure, though. But the previous two days I was able to easily see it.

    One other note: He's not standing on his left leg anymore. I'm guessing when the shock wore off, the pain set in and that's why. I'm exploring pain relievers today to see what I can offer him. Bach Rescue Remedy noticeably calms him, which also helps with stress and his pain tolerance. But I don't want a suffering chicken, so hopefully I can figure out a good option to help him.

    I sure hope documenting all of this helps other folks.
     
    puffypoo22 and Tlmcq like this.
  8. Tlmcq

    Tlmcq Songster

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    Avian vet told me to give duck Turmeric for pain, not sure if works for chickens too. Lavender oil on wounds can help pain and is antibacterial too.
     
    Kenny_ likes this.
  9. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Free Ranging

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    Pain is sometimes good in chickens - keeps them from moving and possibly making injuries worse.
    I did notice when you first posted, you asked about pain treatment - I'm sure there are natural remedies that can be explored. I did not recommend aspirin at that time, since it was not known whether he has bleeding/internal injuries - don't want to give aspirin if they are bleeding. If you feel that he is healing, you can dissolve 81mg of aspirin to 1quart of water. The aspirin water might be bitter and he may not like it - some do have success by sweetening the water a little (honey, agave, etc. )

    I understand he's not eating much - but is he pooping o.k.?
     
  10. Sunshine Flock

    Sunshine Flock Crowing

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    Tumeric is amazing. Thank you for mentioning it. I'll have to do some reading and see what I can learn.
     
    Kenny_ likes this.

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