Rooster with a pecked head and neck

Wyorp Rock

nope
Premium Feather Member
Sep 20, 2015
34,064
47,589
1,262
Southern N.C. Mountains
A rooster is way easier to put back into a flock of hens than it is to add a single hen back into a flock of hens with a rooster.

It's wise to not handle a rooster while molting unless absolutely necessary. Separation is not punishment, it's a way to restore the bird back to health. A rooster that is struggling and left with hens is very likely to be brought down further than one that is given extra care and built back up. Once he's in prime condition, if the hen needs to be put in her place, he's the one that will do it if he's worth keeping.

Roosters have their own standing in a flock. Hens have theirs.

It would also be nice if the OP would post some more photos of the rooster and the spot she' concerned about now.
 

Chicalina

Crowing
Aug 1, 2020
1,598
2,173
261
UK
A rooster is way easier to put back into a flock of hens than it is to add a single hen back into a flock of hens with a rooster.

It's wise to not handle a rooster while molting unless absolutely necessary. Separation is not punishment, it's a way to restore the bird back to health. A rooster that is struggling and left with hens is very likely to be brought down further than one that is given extra care and built back up. Once he's in prime condition, if the hen needs to be put in her place, he's the one that will do it if he's worth keeping.

Roosters have their own standing in a flock. Hens have theirs.

It would also be nice if the OP would post some more photos of the rooster and the spot she' concerned about now.
You have a certain point, however I think it depends more so on the individual birds than their sex. I haven't observed what you say in my flock.

If it was generalised bullying by more than just one hen, then I would probably do as you suggest and bring him out, because there wouldn't be any other option to protect him (unless the sock works). Since it is only one hen, and her behaviour may encourage others to follow, then I'd take her out first. When she goes back she may have broken her pecking habit and/or be lowered in status (and him recovered) that she wouldn't dare repeat as he would put her back in her place.

Just my view fwiw.

I agree that we need photos.
 

Dee the Feather

In the Brooder
Sep 13, 2020
24
16
26
Oxfordshire, England
Folks, just to thank you all for helping me with Dennis my pecked rooster. Sorry to go off air with this. I separated him off for a day or two but in the end decided to let them sort it out for themselves and also took up on the suggestion of feeding him mealworms... he looks much better now and seems to have regained his mojo. Now I have another issue with his favourite lady still getting too much attention... she has had a saddle on for a couple of weeks or more, which I have just removed as it seemed to be harming rather than helping her feathers. We shall see.... possibly November gloom will dampen his attentions.
 

Dee the Feather

In the Brooder
Sep 13, 2020
24
16
26
Oxfordshire, England
A rooster is way easier to put back into a flock of hens than it is to add a single hen back into a flock of hens with a rooster.

It's wise to not handle a rooster while molting unless absolutely necessary. Separation is not punishment, it's a way to restore the bird back to health. A rooster that is struggling and left with hens is very likely to be brought down further than one that is given extra care and built back up. Once he's in prime condition, if the hen needs to be put in her place, he's the one that will do it if he's worth keeping.

Roosters have their own standing in a flock. Hens have theirs.

It would also be nice if the OP would post some more photos of the rooster and the spot she' concerned about now.
 

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