Run re do

Hjgh91

Chirping
Jun 14, 2021
38
96
61
Wisconsin
So, we are re doing/expanding our run. I built it (poorly, if I am being honest)summer of 2019 ago with basic wood and chicken wire, and now it's basically disintegrating. With the price of lumber as well as not wanting to have to plan things myself...I am looking at pre made options. Mostly metal frames. For both of these options, I would use hardware cloth instead of chicken wire as I want to make it sturdier. We have had no predator issues/losses so far, but I consider us lucky. I do lock the chickens up every night in their (much sturdier) coop. I plan to get an automatic door soon also.

So, this is what I've narrowed it down to. The "greenhouse" one is cheaper, but I am worried it will be tough to bend the hardware cloth on the curved parts. The actual animal run one at least is straight....but costs more. Does anyone have experience with using either of these options and modifying it with hardware cloth?

Screenshot_20210709-104237_Aosom.jpg Screenshot_20210709-104117_Aosom.jpg
 

Hjgh91

Chirping
Jun 14, 2021
38
96
61
Wisconsin
How many chickens do you have? Where are you located? Don't discount lumber as the price is coming down.
Right now we just have 4 hens and 1 rooster (rooster is very recently acquired and in the next few days we should be getting at least 6 more hens, so significantly increasing flock size). We live in northeastern Wisconsin, out in the country-we have seen bears and raccoons on our land, and plenty of hawks and eagles, luckily they have never gotten to the chickens so far. Our "coop" is a 10x10 raised shed that was on the property when we moved in, someone before us modified it to be a coop and it has served us well the past few years.
 

MissE

Crowing
Oct 17, 2020
1,098
3,360
331
Northern MN
I have two similar greenhouses, and the frames are crap. Not at all strong or sturdy. You will bend it trying to fit the hardware cloth.

For less money, you could use cattle panels covered in hardware cloth. Five panels would cost about $125. Yes, you will need some lumber, but not a lot. It will surely be less expensive than the first option, and stronger than the second.
 

Hjgh91

Chirping
Jun 14, 2021
38
96
61
Wisconsin
I have two similar greenhouses, and the frames are crap. Not at all strong or sturdy. You will bend it trying to fit the hardware cloth.

For less money, you could use cattle panels covered in hardware cloth. Five panels would cost about $125. Yes, you will need some lumber, but not a lot. It will surely be less expensive than the first option, and stronger than the second.
Ah good to know. I definitely won't go with the greenhouse then. Now I'm pricing out lumber to see if I could manage to build a new better one (my construction skills have improved since the first try, ha!). I am anxious to start this weekend and don't want to wait for shipping!
 

Krugerrand

Songster
Apr 17, 2020
661
1,604
243
SW Pennsylvania
I have two similar greenhouses, and the frames are crap. Not at all strong or sturdy. You will bend it trying to fit the hardware cloth.

For less money, you could use cattle panels covered in hardware cloth. Five panels would cost about $125. Yes, you will need some lumber, but not a lot. It will surely be less expensive than the first option, and stronger than the second.
cattle panels sandwiched between T-Posts are super sturdy and eliminate most of the wood needed.
 

Hjgh91

Chirping
Jun 14, 2021
38
96
61
Wisconsin
cattle panels sandwiched between T-Posts are super sturdy and eliminate most of the wood needed.
Interesting. Something like this? I've never used cattle panels but they are available near me. How do you attach the hardware cloth-j clips? Hog ties?

ok edited to add that a quick search found me some plans on here, duh. Now I think this might be my best option both money wise and assembly wise-seems easier than constructing a whole one of lumber. Do you attach the hardware cloth before or after bending the hoops? Alternately, It appears I could just use the panels straight up as walls/ceiling without bending them in a hoop shape. I am sure I could still use primarily t posts (so much cheaper) with a wood base. So many possibilities!

I am sure I will encounter this answer eventually as I search!
 

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Krugerrand

Songster
Apr 17, 2020
661
1,604
243
SW Pennsylvania
Interesting. Something like this? I've never used cattle panels but they are available near me. How do you attach the hardware cloth-j clips? Hog ties?
Check out the run on Blooie's coop page:
https://www.backyardchickens.com/articles/motel-chix.67240/

I used nylon cord. With the peg sides facing in on the panel, it's not going anywhere. Especially since the hardware cloth extends about 2' passed the end of the panel and is landscape pinned to the ground. To lift, something would have to be standing more than 2' away or would be holding it down at the same time.

The trick is getting hardware cloth on it first. For that I used mostly extreme weather plastic zip ties. That needs to be secured tightly. I've seen people reference metal zip ties, hog rings, bailing wire, and concrete rebar ties. I started with some concrete rebar ties but they started to rust pretty quickly. (if it's not plastic, be sure it's either galvanized or stainless.)

Lots of discussion recently on this recent thread about securing fencing:
https://www.backyardchickens.com/threads/pawhut-24-chicken-coop-galvanized-metal.1480177/

If you go hoop run, look at what other people did to see what you want to do. Here are a bunch of resources:
https://www.backyardchickens.com/articles/top-10-hoop-coop-ideas.76490/
 

Hjgh91

Chirping
Jun 14, 2021
38
96
61
Wisconsin
Check out the run on Blooie's coop page:
https://www.backyardchickens.com/articles/motel-chix.67240/

I used nylon cord. With the peg sides facing in on the panel, it's not going anywhere. Especially since the hardware cloth extends about 2' passed the end of the panel and is landscape pinned to the ground. To lift, something would have to be standing more than 2' away or would be holding it down at the same time.

The trick is getting hardware cloth on it first. For that I used mostly extreme weather plastic zip ties. That needs to be secured tightly. I've seen people reference metal zip ties, hog rings, bailing wire, and concrete rebar ties. I started with some concrete rebar ties but they started to rust pretty quickly. (if it's not plastic, be sure it's either galvanized or stainless.)

Lots of discussion recently on this recent thread about securing fencing:
https://www.backyardchickens.com/threads/pawhut-24-chicken-coop-galvanized-metal.1480177/

If you go hoop run, look at what other people did to see what you want to do. Here are a bunch of resources:
https://www.backyardchickens.com/articles/top-10-hoop-coop-ideas.76490/
Wow thank you so much! Time for me to make a 3rd plan, hopefully my last!
 

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