sad discovery

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by emmak, Jun 5, 2010.

  1. emmak

    emmak Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 29, 2010
    North Central Texas
    When I let my chickens out this morning I found my little white silkie laying on her side almost dead. She died a little while later. There was an egg right beside her. She seemed to have a bunch of poop on her butt. Her feathers were looking ragged the last few days, so I thought she might be molting. So sad to lose her. We only had her for about three weeks. Any ideas what might have happened? Also, are my other three chickens in danger?
     
  2. PurpleChicken

    PurpleChicken Tolerated.....Mostly

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    You had her for three weeks? Were your other chickens exposed to her? If so than whatever killed her can potentially kill your other chickens. Biosecurity and isolation is critical for a healthy flock.


    With only the details posted here there is no way to even make an educated guess at what killed her. How old is she? Did she have leg issues or trouble walking? Any nasal or eye discharge?
     
  3. rancher hicks

    rancher hicks Chicken Obsessed

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    Please go back to the "sticky" and answer the questions.

    I would definitely call the seller or person you got her from. And get the biosecurity information from the USDA web site.
     
  4. emmak

    emmak Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 29, 2010
    North Central Texas
    Quote:I got her and an old english bantam hen at the same time. We got all our hens from the same farm. He's well respected in our area and has all his chickens vaccinated, etc. I'm not sure how old she was, because she was a bantam, and being a silkie, didn't have a comb I could judge by. I forgot to ask him when I bought them. She hasn't had any trouble walking, no discharge, seemed happy and fine. I had noticed some runny poop in the run, but haven't the last two days (been trying to watch them to see who it was). What does biosecurity mean? How long could I have isolated her when I got her? She wasn't showing any symptoms?
     
  5. PurpleChicken

    PurpleChicken Tolerated.....Mostly

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    Apr 6, 2007
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    Biosecurity means not exposing your birds to outside diseases. Many of us have paid a high price (as well as our birds) for not following simple practices. Any new birds should be isolated for 30 days from your other birds before they are mixed into your flock, even if they are from the same source. There are many diseases that take a while to show up and also some that may be carried in by the new birds.

    For now just watch your other birds.

    Silkies are more susceptible to disease and injury than most other breeds. Hopefully this was just a random thing.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2010
  6. rancher hicks

    rancher hicks Chicken Obsessed

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    When you quarantine you new birds keep them in a seperate place as far from your current birds for as long as you can. Watch for signs of illness. If you get the information from the USDA it will explain "biosecurity".
     
  7. 3chimama

    3chimama Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 8, 2010
    Pacific Northwest
    I am so sorry for the loss of your chicken...
     

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