sand in the sleeping area???

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by the3ofus+oursixchicks, Sep 24, 2011.

  1. the3ofus+oursixchicks

    the3ofus+oursixchicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 22, 2011
    alabama
    ok i have been reading here alot about how good sand is. ok my question is is it ok to put it in the floor of their sleeping house?
     
  2. WalkerH

    WalkerH Chillin' With My Peeps

    Yeah, I know lots of people who do. I am looking into it actually. I have it on the brooder floor, it heated up well on the surface and was cool underneath, which was good cause some liked to dust bathe in it and it helped cool them down. It is easy to scoop out too.
     
  3. the3ofus+oursixchicks

    the3ofus+oursixchicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 22, 2011
    alabama
    so the sand being somewhat wet under them on the floor wont hurt their breathing while they sleep?
     
  4. WalkerH

    WalkerH Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mine never got very wet unless they spilled the water. Which was a simple fix. Unless you have ducks in there with the chickens I don't think even the dribbles from water are going to hurt them. I had an incident where the chicks I got liked to hang out in the duck brooder, covered in sand and soaked to the bone when I got home one day. Washed them off and dried them, all of them turned out fine, granted four of the six were males. But no I think they will be fine, I actually like sand, but I also love the smell of hay. So it is a toss up, the only downside to hay is it tends to clump somewhat.
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2011
  5. BellevueOmlet

    BellevueOmlet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 10, 2010
    You can add wood chips as well. The go well together.
     
  6. WalkerH

    WalkerH Chillin' With My Peeps

    Yeah, just not cedar chips. Although with winter coming you might be better off getting something that will keep them warmer, or getting sand and adding some bedding on top.
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2011
  7. Over Easy PA

    Over Easy PA Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 8, 2011
    What helps keep them warmer in the coop? Pine shavings or hay?

    Also, the feed store made a big point of telling me I needed a bale of straw .... not hay .... for in my coop. What is the difference?

    I have had pine shavings all summer. Do I need to switch to something else for the winter to be warmer?
     
  8. IRChicken

    IRChicken Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 20, 2011
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2011
  9. WalkerH

    WalkerH Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:No pine shavings are fine. I have read straw is bad because if it is eaten it isn't digested as easily as hay, which is made for animal consumption. As straw is more hard and brittle, more for bedding, but animals don't really know the difference. Or they don't care. Also I have found hay breaks down easier in my compost, which was also a big selling point for me.
     
  10. IRChicken

    IRChicken Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 20, 2011
    Quote:Straw is tubular, like a drinking straw, providing a pocket of air for insulation.
    In home construction Straw Bales are used for this reason, they provide better insulating value compared to hay.

    Sand is a good choice also.
     

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