Seeking advice for Bumblefoot

Bateleur

In the Brooder
Apr 8, 2015
12
0
22
Hi, I've been trying to eliminate a case of bumblefoot for the past month but so far it looks as if it's possibly gotten worse.

A few weeks ago I took my hen into the vet when I first recognized it and was prescribed oral Doxycycline. This past Wednesday when I took her back in for a follow up, the vet and I agreed that little progress was being made so I was given an alternative treatment of triple antibiotic ointment mixed with DMSO and a foot bandage to cover it, changed out twice daily until her next follow up appointment. I also gave her warm Epsom salt soaks and colorless iodine applied topically while she was on the Doxy, but ever since bandaging her feet up I haven't had much of an opportunity to do the Epsom salts (though I hope to work it back in between changing).

The problem is, the scab now looks like it expanded just overnight as seen in the pictures below; the top image was was taken a week ago and the bottom image is what it looks like now.

400

400


My question is, is it just getting worse and should I go ahead and have the vet remove the infection surgically? I originally opted for non invasive treatment because the hen in question is easily frightened and stressed and doesn't like being handled so the vet wants to put her under anesthesia if she were to get the operation (the risk of cardiac arrest just frightens me). Alternatively, would Tricide Neo soaks be effective between bandage changes or would the ointment and DMSO just neutralize it?
 
Last edited:

Judy

Crowing
Premium Feather Member
10 Years
Feb 5, 2009
34,024
579
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South Georgia
There is a solid core which is a bird's version of pus inside her foot. It will be hard to heal it til that comes out.

There is another non surgical method that others have used, which I assume softens and soaks out the core -- but I only have links, no actual experience with this. Check out this thread:

https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/554991/antibiotics-for-bumblefoot#post_7139022or imossible to heal unless that is removed.
 

MrsBachbach

Songster
6 Years
Mar 6, 2013
2,045
343
236
Arkansas
Hi, I've been trying to eliminate a case of bumblefoot for the past month but so far it looks as if it's possibly gotten worse.

A few weeks ago I took my hen into the vet when I first recognized it and was prescribed oral Doxycycline. This past Wednesday when I took her back in for a follow up, the vet and I agreed that little progress was being made so I was given an alternative treatment of triple antibiotic ointment mixed with DMSO and a foot bandage to cover it, changed out twice daily until her next follow up appointment. I also gave her warm Epsom salt soaks and colorless iodine applied topically while she was on the Doxy, but ever since bandaging her feet up I haven't had much of an opportunity to do the Epsom salts (though I hope to work it back in between changing).

The problem is, the scab now looks like it expanded just overnight as seen in the pictures below; the top image was was taken a week ago and the bottom image is what it looks like now.

400

400


My question is, is it just getting worse and should I go ahead and have the vet remove the infection surgically? I originally opted for non invasive treatment because the hen in question is easily frightened and stressed and doesn't like being handled so the vet wants to put her under anesthesia if she were to get the operation (the risk of cardiac arrest just frightens me). Alternatively, would Tricide Neo soaks be effective between bandage changes or would the ointment and DMSO just neutralize it?


It's not a bad case, yet, but bumblefoot usually has to be removed to heal. I wouldn't put the bird under to do it. I've done several with nothing more than a towel wrapped around the bird to hold it secure and keep it calm. Not saying it doesn't hurt, but if there is a chance the bird will die under anethesia, the pain is a small price to pay. I have found they rarely, rarely ever make a big noisy fuss. Ever. It is instinctive in them to remain fairly quiet. But if you want don't want to do it yourself and can spend money on her, let the vet remove it.
If you want to do it yourself, look at what I did here:
https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/236649/bumblefoot-surgery-with-pics-and-how-to/630#post_15105279
Now, prior to the surgery, I soaked the foot in epsom salts every few day and after the soak, I would apply a sugar/betadine poultice and wrap it up. Change the poultice every couple of days. The poultice draws the infection down and helps soften the scab for lifting. Do this for a couple of weeks before surgery. If you can't do the surgery, do this before you take the bird to the vet. I think it will really help make the surgery more successful.
The poultice is simple, sugar and just enough betadine or iodine to make a paste that isn't too dry or to runny. Put a glob of that on the foot and apply a guaze pad, then wrap with vetwrap, then sports tape or bandaging tape. Change it every two or three days, doing the epsom salt soak before changing the poultice.
 

Bateleur

In the Brooder
Apr 8, 2015
12
0
22
It's not a bad case, yet, but bumblefoot usually has to be removed to heal. I wouldn't put the bird under to do it. I've done several with nothing more than a towel wrapped around the bird to hold it secure and keep it calm. Not saying it doesn't hurt, but if there is a chance the bird will die under anethesia, the pain is a small price to pay. I have found they rarely, rarely ever make a big noisy fuss. Ever. It is instinctive in them to remain fairly quiet. But if you want don't want to do it yourself and can spend money on her, let the vet remove it.
If you want to do it yourself, look at what I did here:
https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/236649/bumblefoot-surgery-with-pics-and-how-to/630#post_15105279
Now, prior to the surgery, I soaked the foot in epsom salts every few day and after the soak, I would apply a sugar/betadine poultice and wrap it up. Change the poultice every couple of days. The poultice draws the infection down and helps soften the scab for lifting. Do this for a couple of weeks before surgery. If you can't do the surgery, do this before you take the bird to the vet. I think it will really help make the surgery more successful.
The poultice is simple, sugar and just enough betadine or iodine to make a paste that isn't too dry or to runny. Put a glob of that on the foot and apply a guaze pad, then wrap with vetwrap, then sports tape or bandaging tape. Change it every two or three days, doing the epsom salt soak before changing the poultice.
I really wanted to get the operation but she's so high strung and struggles so much (even with a towel over her) when being handled that the vet wants to put her under. If I can convince the vet to try the operation without the anesthesia then I'll definitely go for it.

Is Tricide Neo still worth a shot?
 

MrsBachbach

Songster
6 Years
Mar 6, 2013
2,045
343
236
Arkansas
I really wanted to get the operation but she's so high strung and struggles so much (even with a towel over her) when being handled that the vet wants to put her under. If I can convince the vet to try the operation without the anesthesia then I'll definitely go for it.

Is Tricide Neo still worth a shot?


I'm not familiar with it so have no opinion.

You have to wrap the hen up snugly in the towel and throw the end of it over her head so it's dark. Leave the feet sticking out. Pin the wings to the body before wrapping. I use a clothes pin to secure the ends of the towel.

I would do the poultice and soaks for two weeks before taking to the vet to remove it. In that thread I posted, some lady had taken hers to a vet and they cut it etc., and, imo, it looked worse after the vet was done with it. Just awful. It's something they probably don't do often. If you can draw down the infection, the removal of the core is so much easier and results are much better. Less trauma for the hen when you don't have to dig all over in the foot looking for all the infection.
 

MrsBachbach

Songster
6 Years
Mar 6, 2013
2,045
343
236
Arkansas
I really wanted to get the operation but she's so high strung and struggles so much (even with a towel over her) when being handled that the vet wants to put her under. If I can convince the vet to try the operation without the anesthesia then I'll definitely go for it.

Is Tricide Neo still worth a shot?


Well, reading up on what others say about it, and since your case does not look severe, I would say give it a try. Non surgical is always worth a try.
 

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