set eggs fat side down! help! **repost**

Pywakyt

Chirping
May 11, 2015
74
4
51
I swear I did tons of research before setting my chicken eggs two weeks ago exactly and I thought it all said fat side down! I just found out last night that's wrong. Should I turn them pointy side down now?! Or just wait it out and see how it goes and do it right next time? Also the air sacs are the size they should be at day seven and this is day fourtee. Any advice on that too?
 

Pywakyt

Chirping
May 11, 2015
74
4
51
I took them out of the Turner and laid them on their sides earlier today after following the advice of Yorkshire Coop (?name)
 

Pywakyt

Chirping
May 11, 2015
74
4
51
Okay, good! At least now I know what to do next time and I'm still hopeful some will survive.
 

AmyLynn2374

Humidity Queen
5 Years
Oct 11, 2014
15,028
2,678
456
Gouverneur, NY
I swear I did tons of research before setting my chicken eggs two weeks ago exactly and I thought it all said fat side down! I just found out last night that's wrong. Should I turn them pointy side down now?! Or just wait it out and see how it goes and do it right next time? Also the air sacs are the size they should be at day seven and this is day fourtee. Any advice on that too?
Small air cells, I would run dry starting now. It may take 48 hours to increase the size running dry, or you may need to run dry until lockdown to improve the size. Then up the humidity normally for lockdown. I would check the air cells every 24 hours for confirmation and to know when to adjust it back. That is what I would do.
 

AmyLynn2374

Humidity Queen
5 Years
Oct 11, 2014
15,028
2,678
456
Gouverneur, NY
50-55% I live in the desert so I was worried they'd get too dry
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30-35% is much better. The low humidity incubation methods can be used in drier climates as well, you just may not be able to go totally dry. I prefer running totally dry, but like this last hatch for Easter, my bator only held about 16% totally dry,(I only run dry if it holds above 25%) so I added a wet sponge to keep it right at the 30% mark. The best way to tell if your humidity is good is by monitoring your air cells. In my signature at the bottom of my post is a blog article on the method I use if you are interested. I don't usually have a problem with air cells, and I swear by that method. (Providing of course the hatcher has accurate thermometers/hygrometer and a steady incubator.)

Many people in drier and more arid areas don't think they can use this method, but as long as you are monitoring air cells to confirm proper progress you can. I wouldn't reecommend it for higher elevations though as humidity is a big issue for hatchers in higher elevations.
 

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