Sexing 5 week old Cornish X

Josh L.

Songster
Oct 2, 2017
213
475
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Golden Valley, Arizona
Currently, I've been raising some Cornish X chicks for my mother, and I'll be keeping three as breeders (feed restriction and whatnot, obviously, so everyone is being feed restricted currently to gain muscle and being allowed to run around as they please. This will be my first attempt breeding meat birds but we'llsee how it goes! If it all goes to hell ill try red rangers next, but they had been out of stock so I ended up with Cornish Xs), and I think I got lucky on this bunch, it looks like I've only got one or two roos in the entire batch!
There's one very obvious little cockerel, and one who I'm suspicious of, but the others all seem to be pullets, based on the wing growth from when they were two-five day old chicks, as well as current comb growth.
20201221_083308.jpg

^^^ Here is my for-sure roo baby, and definitely the most excitable and active of all of them, so he's going to be my breeder roo. Theyre all in a temporary chicken tractor (5ft x 5 ft roughly) until I add a nest box (and remove their makeshift box with a heat lamp, which has a cage and is above the box by about three inches, so little to no fire risk there) and another section with another cattle panel for the three I'll be keeping (along with my little fiesty child, the chick that hatched in late November who's been raised with these guys. She seems to be a pullet so no reason not to keep her!)
Theyre still young yet, but I wanted to be sure I was right about the sex of this little man. Ill put a comparison here (with two presumed pullets) from about a week ago:
20201217_154742.jpg

Thoughts? Thanks in advance!

PS: I have done a lot of research on breeding these guys, but any advice would be helpful! From what I've gathered, it is possible as long as they aren't overfed. They look EXTRA fluffy right now on their breasts because its been very chilly lately (which is why they still have a heat lamp, if it were summer they wouldn't have needed one in the first place)!
 

Josh L.

Songster
Oct 2, 2017
213
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Golden Valley, Arizona
Better pics are needed. One in the bottom pic looks like a cockerel. The first one is definitely a boy.
Thats what I wanted to be sure of! Ill be posting more pics of the (presumed) pullets when I finish cooking breakfast and head back out there! The cockerel in the bottom pic is the same as in the top, just a weeks difference in comb growth!
 

HappyDuckie

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Thats what I wanted to be sure of! Ill be posting more pics of the (presumed) pullets when I finish cooking breakfast and head back out there! The cockerel in the bottom pic is the same as in the top, just a weeks difference in comb growth!
Try and get good pics of their combs. That will make it easiest to sex them. Good luck on your breeding them!
 

JedJackson

Crossing the Road
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Jul 6, 2016
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Cornish crosses are bred from very specific strains of poultry by the hatcheries to give them the qualities that are desirable in meat birds. You won't get the same results just breeding the crosses together, even if it is possible. The growth will not be as fast and the size will not be as large. Also, these crosses are notoriously short lived. Most don't live for a year. I hope it works out for you, but you should know what to expect.
 

Josh L.

Songster
Oct 2, 2017
213
475
115
Golden Valley, Arizona
Cornish crosses are bred from very specific strains of poultry by the hatcheries to give them the qualities that are desirable in meat birds. You won't get the same results just breeding the crosses together, even if it is possible. The growth will not be as fast and the size will not be as large. Also, these crosses are notoriously short lived. Most don't live for a year. I hope it works out for you, but you should know what to expect.
Thats what I've heard, though I've also seen success stories. Red Rangers were my first choice, but they were out of stock, so I figured an experiment couldn't hurt. I'd definitely cull them if they were in bad shape (couldn't walk, trouble in the heat, etc), but its worth a shot! They'll have a fan set up in the coop come spring time so they don't overheat, and I'll be moving it to a shady spot so they have a better chance. If all fails, at least I'll know better for next time!
 

Josh L.

Songster
Oct 2, 2017
213
475
115
Golden Valley, Arizona
Apologies for the screenshots, I took a video so I could get good pictures of the chicks.

Here is front left to the back: pullet, cockerel (for sure, hard to see because his head is down), pullet, pullet, cockerel?, pullet?, pullet?. Tried to get the two in the back to lift their heads but they were busy with breakfast! There are also two CX's in the box that didn't want to leave their warm little huddle. They'll be out later, but those two are the slightly smaller duo and the little barred x BSL chick that hatched a bit after I got these guys. Pretty sure those two are also pullets, when compared to my one definite roo and one possible roo.
Screenshot_20201221-094022_Video Player.jpg

This one I'm thinking may also be a little cockerel, based on how red (and big!) his comb and wattles already are, compared to the others:
Screenshot_20201221-094039_Video Player.jpg

Here he is with the other for-sure little cockerel (who's on the left):
Screenshot_20201221-094043_Video Player.jpg


These little ones are also allowed to free range (when supervised, since they're still little and I dont want the big girls picking on them!), so they're fiesty little buggers for meat chicks!
Edit: they are a little dirty because they just had a nice little dust bath haha
 

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