Shipping birds in the winter?

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by djmooney, Jan 7, 2010.

  1. djmooney

    djmooney Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 13, 2009
    i have 5 young shamos being shipped from florida to me and im way up in maine. how long does it take and what are the chances of them making it through the trip. the lady is shipping them monday. They are of couple of months old know. im just nervouse
     
  2. Poulets De Cajun

    Poulets De Cajun Overrun With Chickens

    Are you kidding me? Not a very good idea by any stretch of the imagination.
     
  3. Goose and Fig

    Goose and Fig Grateful Geese

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    Apr 19, 2009
    Fall Creek Falls TN
    If they are a few months old they should have plenty of feathers. She should throw in some heat packs in case they get stuck at the PO dock overnight or something like that. Hope they're coming express!
     
  4. rainplace

    rainplace Interstellar Duck Academy

    Quote:Why?
     
  5. Birch Run Farm

    Birch Run Farm Biddy up!

    Sep 5, 2008
    VERMONT
    I'm shipping a cockerel from Vermont to Arizona today.
     
  6. Poulets De Cajun

    Poulets De Cajun Overrun With Chickens

    Quote:Why?

    Because its COLD.... and its even colder at higher altitudes, and a 1/8" thick cardboard box doesn't give much in the way of warmth. That combined with the fact that they are young isn't the best combination.

    The USDA has clear guidelines on temperature limits (45° to 85° limits).​
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2010
  7. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    Jan 11, 2007
    there can be delays... boxes get forgotten...
    wait till spring
     
  8. Poulets De Cajun

    Poulets De Cajun Overrun With Chickens

    Quote:I wasn't even thinking about box delays... but thats another good point.
     
  9. Birch Run Farm

    Birch Run Farm Biddy up!

    Sep 5, 2008
    VERMONT
    Quote:Why?

    Because its COLD.... and its even colder at higher altitudes, and a 1/8" thick cardboard box doesn't give much in the way of warmth. That combined with the fact that they are young isn't the best combination.

    The USDA has clear guidelines on temperature limits (45° to 85° limits).

    Beause it's cold? Are you serious? Well, so by living in Vermont where it routinely gets down to -35 degrees F I am violating USDA guidlines in keeping fowl in a chicken coop?
     
  10. rainplace

    rainplace Interstellar Duck Academy

    Quote:Why?

    Because its COLD.... and its even colder at higher altitudes, and a 1/8" thick cardboard box doesn't give much in the way of warmth. That combined with the fact that they are young isn't the best combination.

    The USDA has clear guidelines on temperature limits (45° to 85° limits).

    I don't have enough experience to agree or disagree, but thank you for at least posting a reason why instead of just a flippant response. Now I know what to use as a starting point when looking into it.

    I had day olds shipped to me Dec 12. They all arrived healthy Dec. 14. They came with two heat packs in the box. Does that make a difference?
     

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