Should I get rescue chickens from a battery farm or free range farm???

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by JohnPeel, Oct 15, 2012.

  1. JohnPeel

    JohnPeel Chillin' With My Peeps

    We haven't got our chickens yet, as I am still working on my coop https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/spare-wood-and-spare-space-i-think-i-will-build-a-coop

    We called in to a free-range chicken farm that produces eggs from the chickens that are let out during the day on a 20 acre farm. There are thousands and thousands of chickens at this farm, and they seem really active, running around the farm. Although most have no feathers around their bums. The other option is battery chickens that mostly have no feathers anywhere.

    Battery Chicken
    [​IMG]
    OK OK, this above picture is a little extreme, but this one below isnt, and the poor thing is still alive!
    [​IMG]


    Free Range Chicken
    [​IMG]

    What would you do?
     
  2. gardendufus

    gardendufus Chillin' With My Peeps

    Personally, with my limited experience, I would stay away from both those sources.
     
  3. ramirezframing

    ramirezframing Overrun With Chickens

    9,123
    304
    306
    Mar 2, 2011
    Knee Deep
    never had any of these choices. But they are letting go of their end of first laying season hens I guess. If healthy I see no problem in any of them, just wouldn't pay top dollar.
     
  4. RoostersCrow HensDeliver!

    RoostersCrow HensDeliver! Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,920
    115
    191
    Apr 11, 2011
    SE Michigan
    I wouldn't prefer either of those sources, but if they were the only choices I would go with the free range hens. My reasoning is that you can get maybe 2 more years of eggs out of the non-hybrid birds (which you are probably not going to find in a battery house) .
    If you go for the hybrid battery layers, you are only going to get about another years worth of eggs out of them and then they'll be done laying. I wouldn't like having to get a new flock of hens every year. Also, there's not a lot of meat on the super layers either when it comes time to butcher them.
     
  5. Chick_In_The_Burbs

    Chick_In_The_Burbs Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,014
    63
    213
    Jun 26, 2010
    Western Washington
    Just because I am a softy, I would get the battery birds, give them a year or so of good living, then butcher when they stop laying and go back for more. Cycle of life with a bit of mercy. Best I can come up with. :/
     
  6. cluckcluckluke

    cluckcluckluke Overrun With Chickens

    TOP DOLLAR!! i wouldnt even pay a cent for those, but id rather go for the free rangers, although the battery hens do look hilarious and you can get ones in better condition.
     
  7. ramirezframing

    ramirezframing Overrun With Chickens

    9,123
    304
    306
    Mar 2, 2011
    Knee Deep
    most hens if not all keep laying past a year or 2. I had a hen live to 11 years old she quite laying at 10. Now I didn't get but maybe 5 eggs that 10 th year but was happy to have the bird. Same with a silkie hen that went at 14. As the bird ages you get less eggs, but they still lay.
     
  8. MamaMarcy

    MamaMarcy Chillin' With My Peeps

    879
    8
    121
    Aug 28, 2011
    Snohomish, WA
    I would rescue the battery hens and give them a good life. But butchering and only using them for egg value is not my thing...I just like the birds themselves.
     
  9. KnobbyOaks

    KnobbyOaks Chillin' With My Peeps

    649
    9
    91
    Sep 10, 2012
    Central Texas
    Thank you for this comment. I have been wondering about this since all the talk of layers playing out at 2!!! Gosh, we can't all be marathoners in our older years but we still have something to contribute. A few eggs here and there would meet that criteria as far as I'm concerned.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2012
  10. ramirezframing

    ramirezframing Overrun With Chickens

    9,123
    304
    306
    Mar 2, 2011
    Knee Deep
    I am pretty sure there is an ex-battery hen thread on here, they might be able to give you more insight in this matter
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by