should I go with a breeder?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by SeattleChickenHead, Nov 1, 2010.

  1. SeattleChickenHead

    SeattleChickenHead Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 26, 2010
    Hi, I was wondering if I want to breed good dual-purpose birds (BR, BO,RIR etc.) for eggs and meat, not show, should I start with breeder birds? Or just go with MM or Ideal chicks and select the best ones?

    I have 2 BR pullets from MM, They are 16wks old, I weighed them today, one was 2.75 lbs. , better more defined bars than the other, also showing signs of sexual maturity faster. The other girl is 3lbs. more "blurred" barring and less signs of maturity, but is the smarter of the two I think, or the more daring and bold....

    They both great but its interesting how different they are. Is this poor genetics? Is it possible to raise show quality BRs or similar that lay just as many eggs? I really like they English dark-barr lines, but understand theyre not as good for eggs and meat.

    Also Im aware I cant have a rooster in Seattle, but I have a friend with alot of chickens who could "rent him a room"[​IMG]

    Suggestions?

    Thanks

    *If youve got quality RIR, GLW, B.Aust, BR (good dual) or similar OR if youd like to share on a order of these kinds of birds when I do find them, PM me
    ALSO I dont want any shots or antibiotics.*
     
  2. ultasol

    ultasol Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 30, 2009
    SE Washington
    In my experience, the breeder birds are larger,.. so I would go with a decent pair of breeder quality birds from someone who exhibits (try the show in Chehalis, WA in early Dec) and then select for fast growth rates in future generations.
     
  3. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    Oct 19, 2009
    Forks, WA
    Most definitely yes, you should go with a breeder!

    Hatchery based Orpingtons, Rocks, and Rhode Island Reds - Even New Hampshires, are and will always be "production type," that is, they will always have almost no meat on their bodies, an underweight body, and lay more eggs than normal. After all, hatcheries only breed chickens to lay as much eggs as possible so they can sell as many chicks as possible. Nothing more.

    True Heritage types, heavier and truly "dual purpose," are what people show. [​IMG] I don't know of any breeders in WA, but there is an NPIP list for our state that you could take a look at. I'm sure you'll find someone on that list. I know for a fact that a nearby lady got herself some good quality Rhode Island Whites.

    Also, a really good and easy approach is to buy shipped hatching eggs from breeders. That way, you can get from breeders around the nation. Sure, it takes a broody hen or an incubator - But it is WELL worth it!
     
  4. Robert Blosl

    Robert Blosl Rest in Peace -2013

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    Mar 1, 2010
    Silverhill, Alabama
    When you go to the show ask to talk to Tony Albritten and see if he has any large fowl Barred Rocks. Next my old chicken frends Jim Volk who has white plymouth rocks and Tom Durgun from the Centralia Washington area may be able to help you. I heard Tom left the show in Minnisotta with some large fowl Barred Rocks he may be able to help you latter in the spring with some females.

    I am getting some Barred Rock Large Fowl eggs from a new guy in Nebraska who has a old old strain that goes back about 90 years. He has about 20 females to get eggs from this spring and he might be able to help you. These are not the normal hatchery Barred Chickens. These are the real old fashion Barred Plymouth Rocks that are breed to lay have meat and have clean black and white barring.

    These three fellows can help you as all three are members of the Plymouth Rock Fanicers club and can be a big help for you.

    Great breed of dual purpose chickens and love the black and white colors.

    Bob

    go to this thread and see the pictures of his birds he hatched this year.

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=399477&p=7
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2010
  5. tammyd57

    tammyd57 Chillin' With My Peeps

    You could spend 10 years selecting the best from a bad gene pool and STILL have crappy birds. OR you could start out with good genes and have good birds from the beginning. Save time, save money, save aggravation: If you want good quality birds, buy good quality birds.
     

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