Sick chicken

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Princess Fluffybutt, Jun 12, 2017.

  1. Princess Fluffybutt

    Princess Fluffybutt In the Brooder

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    Hi guy's I have a question I have I think its called a australorp or black rock when I got her I was told she was about 18 months old so she is around 2 years old now but the last 2 days she hasn't been herself she looks really sad & not moving around much she is normally out scratching about she can get around ok but is just standing still in her coop & this morning my son noticed her comb is very light in colour can anyone tell me what it could be? She hasn't layed any eggs for a while I was told they stop in winter
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  2. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Got my Puppy

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    Looks more like a sex link that unfortunately don't always live very long due to reproductive problems. She does look unwell, but without any other symptoms many health problems look the same. You may need to find a vet to have a look at her.
     
  3. Princess Fluffybutt

    Princess Fluffybutt In the Brooder

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    So my chances aren't good I just googled sex link & I have another one that was pictured there is this one too?
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  4. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Got my Puppy

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    Your first one looks like a black sex link, and the red hen looks like a red sex link. I read that their higher egg production can cause reproductive cancers. I have had just a couple red sex links but none lived long.

    I have had a few birds act sick, but than improve after a few weeks, so I always give them some time. We generally cull sick birds because I haven't had any luck treating anyone successfully long term.
     
  5. Princess Fluffybutt

    Princess Fluffybutt In the Brooder

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    I can't get to a vet so I'll keep a close eye on her I was told when a chicken starts showing signs of being sick its normally to late :( I've also been told she looks egg bound but she hasn't layed any eggs for a while & the last ones she did lay where soft so I started giving shell grit....how old were yours when you lost them?
     
  6. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Got my Puppy

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    Unfortunately chickens do seem to be well until they are not. One of my few sex links stopped laying after laying daily for about a year, than she died at about 18 months, the other one made it to about 2 years. I know it's not a lot to base a whole breed on but I have read others have had similar experiences. My other breeds will live from 4-10 years of age.
     
  7. Princess Fluffybutt

    Princess Fluffybutt In the Brooder

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    I was getting eggs from her everyday & then all of a sudden she stopped we thought it was the weather turning cold but I did get a lash egg once from her I think that's what its call
     
  8. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Got my Puppy

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    That seems to be the way it goes with them.
     
  9. NZ Roheryn

    NZ Roheryn Hatching

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    Jun 15, 2017
    She does look like she's not feeling well, poor dear. Any change so far? I have some general advice for when you can't get a bird to a vet, but often, by the time you notice something's wrong, it's too late to save them. Still, it's worth trying if you're willing.

    Sick chickens should always be isolated, for several reasons: if whatever they have is contagious, the sooner they're removed from contact with the other birds, the better. Also, the rest of the flock tends to harrass a sick bird -- not helpful for recovery. Finally, you want to keep them quiet and warm, and make eating/drinking as easy as possible, if they're still up to eating/drinking on their own.

    When you put the chicken into isolation, feel her -- is she super-skinny? Normal weight? Empty crop? Distended crop? Any other relevant symptoms? If super-skinny, the problem has been brewing for some time, and she probably doesn't have a chance. If normal weight, it's probably come on quickly, and there could be hope if you can identify the problem, and fix it. lf her crop is empty, she may not be eating/drinking, and needs supportive feeding (with a syringe). If the crop is very full -- she's either just eaten/drunk a lot (not likely with a sick bird), or her crop isn't emptying properly. If her crop isn't emptying properly, she may have sour crop (potentially curable), a blocked crop (potentially curable but needs significant effort right away), or her bodily systems are shutting down (no hope of saving her at that point). Sour crop and blocked crop each have different treatments.

    If I think the bird has a chance, and she's not adequately eating/drinking on her own, I'll provide supportive feeding 2-3 times per day as long as the crop is emptying between feedings. I syringe-feed various goopy mixtures that may include any or all of yogurt, raw or boiled egg yolk, Malt-o-Meal (cooked), olive oil, molasses (proportionally small amounts), canned kitten food, or layer pellets soaked to mushiness. I make sure the goopy mixture has adequate moisture in it to provide both food and water needs. In all cases, I have water available at all times, and in most cases food too.

    In all cases, I keep her in isolation, usually in a box or a small crate in the house, and sometimes under a heat lamp. Birds don't go back out to the paddock with the rest of the flock until they are perky and eating/drinking fine on their own. Sometimes this takes 10 days or more for the ones I manage to save; unfortunately, though, sometimes the best efforts just don't work, and there's plenty of reasons why. At least with this effort, you know you've kept her as comfortable as possible.

    If a bird has a bacterial infection, antibiotics can be life-saving and a trip to the vet is generally very worthwhile.

    Good luck!
     

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