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Small compact coop vs. tall coop?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by MissMonty, Sep 13, 2015.

  1. chickmomma03

    chickmomma03 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I went back and forth on what I wanted too. I decided on a tall coop and I'm REALLY glad I did. I can walk in and clean it with overall ease, access feeder and waterer with ease, etc. I eventually plan to add on or build a 2nd coop too, but right now I have a 4wx8lx6h (I REALLY wanted to build an 8x8 but didn't have the funds). My run is decent size too, so I'm happier with that than a smaller run.
     
  2. 21hens-incharge

    21hens-incharge Overrun With Chickens

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    Covering half is certainly an option. I would cover the half that buts up to the coop so they don't have to trudge through snow to get to the sheltered area if you do cover it.

    There is a place here in Colorado that advertises on Craigs list making giant hoops for green houses and such that are done in METAL so would be stronger for a hoop run.

    I know Blooie has a hoop run and is a wealth of information. I will see if I can find her.
     
  3. 21hens-incharge

    21hens-incharge Overrun With Chickens

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    Blooie is offline but I sent her a PM asking her to pop in and share her experience. She lives in Northern WYO so also has a lot of snow.
     
  4. Mutt Farm

    Mutt Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

    ^^^ X2

    I've seen different styles and pitfalls, but the heavy cattle panel design might work really well for you. Yep on soft and soggy. I'm from Mi. you can look into raising up the run area with gravel and sand for drainage as well.
     
  5. Blooie

    Blooie Team Spina Bifida Premium Member

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    My Coop
    Hi there. I was offline, on my way home from an event in Cheyenne, and found 21hen's PM when I fired up my computer.

    We have a shed style coop and a hoop run which we absolutely love! In winter we cover the hoop with plastic (think greenhouse) and it stayed warmer in there than in the coop. It withstood winds in excess of 60 mph, sideways snow, and the snowload, so we are very content. It's tall enough to walk into easily - a real plus with my physical limitations - and easily expandable. We did that this summer by simply removing the end piece, adding two more fence posts and another cattle panel, then putting the end piece back on. Cattle panels are cheap and easy to build with and done the way we did them they are quite stable.

    Our complete build can be found if you click on "My Coop" under my avatar, and you can peruse to your heart's content. I would also be happy to answer any questions you have, as will most folks on BYC. Here are a couple of pictures our our setup so you can decide if paying our build a visit is something you'd be interested in.
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    In the photos above, we are adding another cattle panel to the existing run. The cattle panels are covered in chicken wire to deter overhead predators and wild birds, and the bottom 2 feet is covered with hardware cloth, folded outward at the bottom to protect against digging.

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    Snow load on the run. All we had to do was go inside and hit the underside with a pushbroom, and most of the snow slid off.

    [​IMG]
    The inside of the run, covered with plastic. It was nice enough in there that I brooded a few batches of chicks, using a heating pad and a straw cave, even though temps were in the teens and twenties and we had a blizzard (or two!). You can see the brooder pen with chicks in it there to the left.


    [​IMG]
    Putting the finishing touches on the plastic covering.


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    The run in summer. The white vinyl lattice serves no real purpose except to make the setup look nicer from the street, since we live in town.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    We love this setup. It's nice to look at and super easy to work with - and in. I hope this helps. Good luck! Oh, and just wanted to add that I always admire folks who want to get the building and preparation done BEFORE they get chicks. Um, I wasn't that smart! [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2015
    2 people like this.
  6. chickmomma03

    chickmomma03 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote: I agree! I had plans for mine already, but did NOT start building until after I got them, so the race was on! It would have been so much better to plan AND build first, in hindsight. I actually hadn't planned on getting any this spring but I was surprised with chicks for Momma's Day and belated Momma's Day gifts so I am happy! So far, only 1 is laying, hopefully others will start soon!
     
  7. MissMonty

    MissMonty Out Of The Brooder

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    This is really awesome! Do they have any access to the shed near it or is this the whole thing? Then it looked like it was wrapped, do you wrap the whole thing except a vent area in the winters? I really like this idea :)

    As far as cost did you find this route more expensive than others when you were researching into your build? I'm looking for something functional and at least semi economical. :) I am going to go stalk your coop now :D
     
  8. MissMonty

    MissMonty Out Of The Brooder

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    Oh and I think I can see but you just have this directly on the ground correct?
     
  9. Blooie

    Blooie Team Spina Bifida Premium Member

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    My Coop
    Everything is directly on the ground. There is no floor in the coop aside from the dirt, and no floor in the run either. We use deep litter in both. Because we had an apricot tree Ken didn't want to take out, the run is offset slightly from the coop and there is a "tunnel" that they go through to get from coop to run and back again. Their pop door is open 24/7, 365 days of the year. In the 5th and 6th pictures from the top you can see the tunnel. It's actually a 3 sided box. It's enclosed on the top, on the side nearest the people door, and on the front. The fourth side is open and up against the coop where the pop door is, the bottom is open and the end into the run is open. It's right there by Ken in the 5th photo and if you click on the last photo to make it bigger you can see a few chickens in it.

    We found the hoop run to be far less expensive than our other options. We used 4 steel fence posts pounded in the ground on each side, and 3 cattle panels arched between them. When we expanded the run this summer we just added two more fence posts and one more cattle panel. The cattle panels are covered in chicken wire with a hardware cloth skirt and apron.

    The shade you see on top of the hoop is landscape fabric. Love that stuff. Tough, air permeable, most water runs off when it rains, and it's cheap and easy to install. If it rips, toss a new piece over. This summer Ken wanted to try a tarp over part of the run for shade, so he got one that was supposed to reflect heat. It didn't. It held it in and the run was much hotter this summer than last. Went back to landscape fabric and won't change again!

    Hope this helps you along.....
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. MissMonty

    MissMonty Out Of The Brooder

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    Oh it does and I love all the photos of your coop! Learned so much and that looks so much more functional than what I was considering. In the winter did you put an actual tarp on top or was it just like painters tarps around the whole thing except the vents?

    Also roughly how big is your coop itself where they can go inside and how many birds do you have?
     

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