Smelly, muddy run - what to do?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by kmb221, Oct 29, 2009.

  1. kmb221

    kmb221 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 18, 2008
    Shippensburg, PA
    If anyone lives in south central PA, you know we have been getting a lot of rain. My run is nothing but mud and stink.

    What do I do? I'm worried about the chickens health with their feet in the mud and also the smell.

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated. It's not raining today or Friday, but more rain on the way for the weekend.
     
  2. MissChessy

    MissChessy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 24, 2007
    Texas
    Your chickens will be fine. My run is muddy and smelly too. I'm in South Texas and we are finally being blessed with the rains.

    When your run dries up, apply Lime and till it in the dirt, or it will burn your chicken's feet. That will eliminate smell and flies. Works like wonders!

    Also, it is funny to see your chickens feet caked with mud and it dries up. Looks like they have a cast on their legs. [​IMG]
     
  3. swimmom

    swimmom Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 7, 2009
    Carolinas
    Add sand, that helps with drainage. I also use DE in the run which helps keep odors down - my chickens are in the city and I don't want to upset the neighbors.
     
  4. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    Grifton NC
    apply Lime and till it in the dirt, or it will burn your chicken's feet.

    "Ag lime" or "pelletized lime" will not burn them.

    "Hydrated lime " WILL​
     
  5. harrisville chicken

    harrisville chicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 2, 2009
    Northern Utah
    Sand in the run is wonderful for drainage, no mud and drying out the poop.
     
  6. joebryant

    joebryant Overrun With Chickens

    Quote:Yep, order a load of construction sand, enough for at least eight inches deep in the run. Occasionally sprinkle diatomaceous earth over it.
     
  7. ZooMummzy

    ZooMummzy Queen of the Zoo

    Mar 31, 2008
    Philomath, Oregon
    I've been using DE whenever the rain lets up and I also applied a thin layer of gravel last weekend we had from our construction projects to an area that was most flooded. They don't mind it at all and it controls the flooding and mud bog a bit. It's the most I can do at this point. I'm going to add sand and dig up the run to put in drainage pipes next summer since we will have lots left over from our front yard project. I'm thanking my husband profusely right now for building the chicken patio a couple months ago! It at least provides them a covered area where I can give them treats and also sit to enjoy them.
     
  8. WiseChicks

    WiseChicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 16, 2008
    Hudson, WI
    I am having the same issue. If we are still in this house next spring, I am putting down gravel and sand a dirt and laying sod in the worst area. They can have the high ground as dirt since it dries quickly, and they all take their mud/dirt baths there.

    I have just about broke my neck slipping and sliding on the slimy dirt. Cannot WAIT for the ground to freeze!

    Katie
     
  9. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Ontario, Canada
    check out the "fixing a muddy run" link in my .sig below; there are a lot of things you can do to limit rain coming in, improve drainage, and raise/dry the ground.

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat
     
  10. RL

    RL Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 8, 2009
    Oak Point, TX
    We have been having a lot rain at my place too and it does not help that I live by a lake. I don't really have a run, unless you count the whole yard as a run, but it is very muddy and takes a long time to dry out even in the 100 deg heat of the summer. Now with the weather turning colder it seems like the yard will never dry out.
    The only place it smells is where I have thrown down scratch grains. The uneaten grain gets pushed into the mud and with it being so wet the grain will spoil, rot and start to ferment. Spoiling rotting grain is one of the worse smells ever; it can even rival a dead animal smell. With that, the smell coming off your run could be from the grains you have tossed into your run. I have taken to putting down Sweet PDZ over the mud where I have spread the grain and now my yard does not smell anymore. Ag lime should do the same, but if it smells real bad I wouldn't wait until it dries I would go ahead and spread it now to knock down the smell.
     

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