Soft shell eggs

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by luvmy33chicks, Aug 19, 2011.

  1. luvmy33chicks

    luvmy33chicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 19, 2011
    Long Island
    I recently started giving my hens food grade DE in their feed.
    Have noticed soft/shell less eggs the past 3 days.
    They get a complete egg laying pellet, scraps, free range and dry cat food for protein daily.
    Was'nt having any problems with eggs until I added the DE
    Any advice would be appreciated
    thanks
     
  2. Czech's_chicks

    Czech's_chicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 24, 2011
    Vista, CA
    In my eggsperience, this is a normal every once in a while thing, along with what I call egg farts (super tiny eggs smaller than quail eggs). If you are getting more than one soft shell from the same hen, there may be something wrong with her internally that is preventing her from depositing the calcium shell.
     
  3. luvmy33chicks

    luvmy33chicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 19, 2011
    Long Island
    thank you
    i am new here and just figured out how to find your reply
    the soft shells stopped and my girls started laying more eggs a day now
    many are young also and new layers
    thanks again
     
  4. JodyJo

    JodyJo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 27, 2010
    Colorado
    you said you give cat food daily? I found this on the BYC treat chart...you may want to reconsider how much you feed...


    "You all know how I feel on cat food and I have posted the links and reasoning behind my objections several times ...it can potentially be detrimental to your birds health and even deadly in the right circumstances and for this reason I feel it should be left off the chart (as when you put it on it is as if you are condoning its use) I will repost here one of the sources for my objection:
    http://www.omri.org/Amino_acids_livestock.html
    ..."While it is nutritionally essential, methionine excesses are far more toxic to poultry than similar excesses of tryptophan, lysine, and threonine (National Research Council, 1994). Force feeding methionine to excess can result in death to chicks (National Research Council, 1994). A dosage of 2 g / mature cat / day (20 to 30 g / kg dry diet) for 20 days induces anorexia, ataxia, cyanosis, methemoglobinemia and Heinz body formation resulting in hemolytic anemia (Maede, 1985). ..."
     

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