Someone please talk to me about sheep...

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by PineBurrowPeeps, Mar 7, 2009.

  1. I am planning to get a pair of goat does this year for milk and now I'm wondering if sheep would fit into the mix for me to have some wool to spin.

    How much wool can you get from a single sheep?

    Can they be housed with goats?

    Are they expensive to feed?

    What breed is it with the black faces and white bodies?

    Any breed suggestions for good wool?
    Thanks!
     
  2. Guitartists

    Guitartists Resistance is futile

    Mar 21, 2008
    Michigan
    I'm learning too... and I've been told that no, it's not a good idea to house them together because they have different feed requirements and the amount of copper that goats need is too much for sheep and also... rare as it may be... they can occasionally crossbreed... which results in aborted pregnancies or sterile offspring.
     
  3. [​IMG] Thanks!

    I was only thinking of keeping females but the dietary thing definately comes into play.
     
  4. Felicia

    Felicia Chillin' With My Peeps

    381
    1
    131
    Feb 26, 2009
    Michigan
    I have 5 goats, and 1 pregnant sheep together. For feeding, I just put the sheep out of the pen and feed her sheep food, and then give the goat food to the goats. And once everyone is finished, my sheep goes back in. Its rather simple. I have a Romney ewe, and I can shear her 3 times a year, and get over 3 inches. I think it depends on the sheep and breed. But my girl grows it like crazy! [​IMG] They are not to expensive to feed. No more then the goats. I was told by a lady who raises tons of sheep (she is a professional shearer, and so was her father, and so was his father...and it keeps on going), and she says white face sheep live longer then black faced sheep. And black hooves grow slower then white hooves. My sheep, Mollia, only needs her hooves trimmed 2-3 times a year. Its really nice. Mollia is extremely friendly, but she isn't all in your face either (which I like). She is extremely attached to me also. I love her to death [​IMG].

    *Edited to add:
    Romney is a wool breed. They have long wool. Its extremely beautiful, and I am saving my wool up so I can get it processed and make something with it.

    Here is a picture of her - its not the best picture of her...she is usually a lot more fluffy. She was shorn 2 mths before this picture.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2009
  5. bheila

    bheila Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 8, 2008
    Kent, Wa
    As Guitarists stated goats require different minerals then sheep. The amount of copper that goats need will kill sheep. If it were me it would be easier to house them separately.
    As far as crossbreeding, I don't think you want any geeps running around [​IMG]
     
  6. Quote:She is beautiful!
    Have you had her since she was a lamb?

    The thing is, I have a small farm and I think I only want one sheep. So I would feel badly penning it seperatly, that she would get lonely.
    I figured if I put her with the two goat does at least she'd have some company.

    Miss Prissy, are you out there? What breed is that STUNNING brown ewe that you have? I can't remember her name but it was something biblical, wasn't it?
     
  7. Felicia

    Felicia Chillin' With My Peeps

    381
    1
    131
    Feb 26, 2009
    Michigan
    Quote:She is beautiful!
    Have you had her since she was a lamb?

    The thing is, I have a small farm and I think I only want one sheep. So I would feel badly penning it seperatly, that she would get lonely.
    I figured if I put her with the two goat does at least she'd have some company.

    Miss Prissy, are you out there? What breed is that STUNNING brown ewe that you have? I can't remember her name but it was something biblical, wasn't it?

    Thank you! Yes, I have had her since she was a lamb. I got her right after she was weaned. I don't think there is any problem with putting the goats and sheep together. Mollia and my alpine goat, Teascha, are best friends. Just separate them for feeding, or you can feed them together - you just have a bowl for each of them and watch them eat so that you know the sheep isn't getting the goat bowls. For my guys, alphalpha is the biggest thing in their diet. Then they each get a handful of grain once a day.

    The only biblical sheep I know of is the Jacob. My friend has one and they are gorgeous! They are brown and white and they have horns.
     
  8. Quote:She is beautiful!
    Have you had her since she was a lamb?

    The thing is, I have a small farm and I think I only want one sheep. So I would feel badly penning it seperatly, that she would get lonely.
    I figured if I put her with the two goat does at least she'd have some company.

    Miss Prissy, are you out there? What breed is that STUNNING brown ewe that you have? I can't remember her name but it was something biblical, wasn't it?

    Thank you! Yes, I have had her since she was a lamb. I got her right after she was weaned. I don't think there is any problem with putting the goats and sheep together. Mollia and my alpine goat, Teascha, are best friends. Just separate them for feeding, or you can feed them together - you just have a bowl for each of them and watch them eat so that you know the sheep isn't getting the goat bowls. For my guys, alphalpha is the biggest thing in their diet. Then they each get a handful of grain once a day.

    The only biblical sheep I know of is the Jacob. My friend has one and they are gorgeous! They are brown and white and they have horns.

    LOL I meant the name of the actual sheep, not her breed name.
    Thanks though so much for the outlook on it! I don't want a breed that has horns, as I have little ones around.
     
  9. PortageGirl

    PortageGirl Chillin' With My Peeps

    Cotswold sheep are a heritage breed, and have fantastic wool. I'm not very knowlegable about sheep... but I have a friend who spins, so I know they have a long fiber fleece which is good for spinning, and that they are somewhat rare, though I think not quite endangered. Also that they have a heavy fleece and are good tempered.

    It's all sort of second hand info and some extra reading by me though , but maybe you'd like to look into them.

    Also, I know they are fine to be pastured with goats but should be fed seperate as others have said, I think seperate salt blocks in the feed area or... loose salt/minerals for goats is important. Again, just second hand info there, so do extra research!!
     
  10. Felicia

    Felicia Chillin' With My Peeps

    381
    1
    131
    Feb 26, 2009
    Michigan
    Quote:[​IMG] Oops. Haha.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by