Sorry..another rooster question :(

Futuregreenefarm

Songster
May 9, 2019
260
402
151
Epworth, GA
I have a cockerel that 19 weeks. He's the leader. He crows close to me and sometimes when I am stooped down to their level, it feels like he crows in my face. He also does the herding dance around my second cockerel when I'm around but I've seen him do it to the pullets also. He's pretty pushy about food and not too concerned that the pullets eat first, sometimes bumping them out of the way. Yet he knows to make the "I found food" call. They come running but he usually eats whatever it is. :(
I am wondering if he is keeping them from me because I've got food he wants or already seeing me as a threat to his flock? And is the crowing bad?
 

BaaKaaawk

Coopster
Premium Feather Member
10 Years
Apr 4, 2011
818
2,571
311
Lexington, KY
The crowing has nothing to do with aggression, you're just near him when he decides it is time to crow. A normal daytime crow is a message to any rooster that can hear him that you're within ear-shot of his territory. It doesn't mean he sees you as a threat.

As for the eating- he is still an animal and will want to eat and the idea that he's setting the table for the hens to eat is nice and good- as long as he's full. If he's not full, he's going to eat- regardless of whether there are hens there.

Really, the only way you'll know if he is getting aggressive towards you is when he attacks- and even the first attack may just be testing you out. When i have a Roo attack me (you'll be surprised an natural human reaction is to back up- which in chicken speak means he's winning and he'll keep advancing) so you need to hold your ground and pin the little monster and then pick him up by his feet and hang him upside-down. He will calm right down! I usually hold mine this way for a good few minutes and prance around the coop and make sure he knows I am the boss. I have had very few Roo's continue to attack after this first meeting of the minds...
 

Futuregreenefarm

Songster
May 9, 2019
260
402
151
Epworth, GA
Thank you!
The crowing has nothing to do with aggression, you're just near him when he decides it is time to crow. A normal daytime crow is a message to any rooster that can hear him that you're within ear-shot of his territory. It doesn't mean he sees you as a threat.

As for the eating- he is still an animal and will want to eat and the idea that he's setting the table for the hens to eat is nice and good- as long as he's full. If he's not full, he's going to eat- regardless of whether there are hens there.

Really, the only way you'll know if he is getting aggressive towards you is when he attacks- and even the first attack may just be testing you out. When i have a Roo attack me (you'll be surprised an natural human reaction is to back up- which in chicken speak means he's winning and he'll keep advancing) so you need to hold your ground and pin the little monster and then pick him up by his feet and hang him upside-down. He will calm right down! I usually hold mine this way for a good few minutes and prance around the coop and make sure he knows I am the boss. I have had very few Roo's continue to attack after this first meeting of the minds...
 

Folly's place

Enabler
9 Years
Sep 13, 2011
23,274
38,609
1,096
southern Michigan
I think that you can tell if the little dude is thinking bad thoughts before a full-on attack, but it does take experience.
He should move away from you as you walk though the flock. Make sure that you do happen to walk 'through' him a few time each week, and that he does respect your space at all times.
Don't get your delicate eyeballs anywhere near your birds!!! If he decides to take you on, don't lead with your face, ever.
I watch my cockerels without chasing them, or being really obvious about it. On the other hand, if I do stare at one, he better not come at me!
Your cockerels are adolescent idiots, especially as they don't have adult birds to show them how to behave, and correct their pushiness.
See how they do, and don't be too upset if one or the other just doesn't get the message. It can happen, or not.
Mary
 

Futuregreenefarm

Songster
May 9, 2019
260
402
151
Epworth, GA
Your cockerels are adolescent idiots, especially as they don't have adult birds to show them how to behave, and correct their pushiness.
Yes I wish they had an older one but this is my first flock. That's why I don't want to mess it up and I want to give them the best chance to be good roosters that I can within reason and hoping they are receptive and don't "go bad". The Daddy rooster was good but he's not mine. Is there any way to try and train them myself? I've witnessed the "neck grab" and I don't go after them but talk to them firmly. I know they don't understand words but I hope they understand tone. And I do walk through them a lot. sometimes when they try to neck grab I try to put myself between them but only if it's slow and easy. I've read Shadrach's article about Understanding your rooster over and over but I have so little experience. :(
 

Folly's place

Enabler
9 Years
Sep 13, 2011
23,274
38,609
1,096
southern Michigan
In many ways, it's not about you, but about how each individual is 'wired' to behave.
You are the giant who brings food, not a flock member, and sensible birds understand this, if you behave that way.
Expect them all to respect your space and move out of your way. I think that if you like birds on your lap, or your shoulder, it should be by invitation only, not random jumping at you.
Chickens are not puppies or kittens; they just don't think that way! Respect them for who they are, and get along with them as the interesting critters they are.
Mary
 

Mrs. K

Free Ranging
11 Years
Nov 12, 2009
9,140
12,017
636
western South Dakota
I respectfully disagree. A rooster that really crows a great deal when you are in the pen, to me is starting to be aggressive. Be aware. If he repeatedly fluffs up and wing flaps when you are there, to me those are beginning signs. I am not worried about an occasional crow or fluff, but repeatedly.

As for training - I do think the march is helpful, however, unless you are living with your chickens, any training is going to be of limited affect.

Do be very aware of children or small women, they are often attacked first.

Mrs K
 

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