Spur removal gone wrong

Dutchgirl

Not Dutch!
11 Years
Apr 1, 2008
5,034
15
266
U.S.A.
About two days a spur removal was attempted on our big BR rooster. Per online instructions, pliers were used to gently twist off each spur. The instructions said that in their experience, 1) there was just a nub under each spur and 2) there was just one drop of blood under each spur. However, we were surprised to find that 1) there seemed to be a fully formed spur directly beneath the spur we removed, and the spur seemed to be partially covered in skin or muscle. 2) The spurs bled. A LOT.

After the spur removal was done, we applied antibiotic ointment to each spur. The rooster sat on the ground for a minute (as if in shock) and then got up and walked around. Outside, he began crowing quite a bit and walking around like everything was okay. I was later alarmed to find that there was quite a bit of blood scattered all over the area where he had walked - blood all over the grass and blood all over the backs of the hens he'd mated.

So my sister caught the rooster and cleaned the spurs and put on more antibiotic ointment. She covered the spurs in gauze.

This morning my sister found the rooster limping. She caught him and removed the gauze. The gauze was green, and the spurs needed cleaning. They are pretty gross and bloody.

I'm not sure what to do in this situation. This is a great rooster and we don't want to lose him to a spur infection. Does he need an antibiotic? We have Duramycin-10.

Thanks in advance.
 

dawg53

Humble
Premium Feather Member
12 Years
Nov 27, 2008
27,705
13,936
886
Glen St Mary, Florida
You might want to cage him if you can and get him started on amoxicillin or penicillin. Apply Blood Stop Powder to his spurs to stop the bleeding. Use the BYC search box for amoxicillin or penicillin dosages.
 

seminolewind

Flock Mistress
Premium Feather Member
13 Years
Sep 6, 2007
18,684
4,107
762
Corydon, Indiana
You might want to cage him if you can and get him started on amoxicillin or penicillin. Apply Blood Stop Powder to his spurs to stop the bleeding. Use the BYC search box for amoxicillin or penicillin dosages.
X2. You may also want to think about Epsom salt soaks.
 

Don Alejo

Chirping
May 15, 2015
12
0
52
I have not previously had the problem of Roos with too long spurs but our lovable Henry was hurting himself and the chickens with his 31/2 inch spurs. I researched it, rejected the hot potato and was not ready for cutting or clipping and tried the gentle twist. After reading Dutchgirls' problem I was concerned but it went very smoothly. There was a new spur underneath, a few drops of blood soon absorbed by gauze , his foot was covered with antibiotic,he was cuddled for a while, given a few treats and he seemed to recover completely. My guess is that things just go wrong sometime (talk to a surgeon) through no ones fault. I would do it again if the need arose.
 

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