still working on my coop, a quick question about using great stuff

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by 19maycraft, Dec 26, 2007.

  1. 19maycraft

    19maycraft Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 5, 2007
    Smithfield, NC
    I have always heard on the board that the chicken coop should not be drafty I am just finishing up..and wanted to fill in the cracks and crevices...I used the stuff that expands that you would put around drafty window frames or around plumbing pipes...

    This should be ok right...I wanted to make sure that the chickens wouldnt peck it and eat it..

    Here is the website

    http://greatstuff.dow.com/greatstuff/diy/index.htm

    Just wanted to make sure..Thanks
     
  2. Cheryl

    Cheryl Chillin' With My Peeps

    If it is anything like my coop, (yet to actually have chickens in it), the foam will be exposed even after trimming it...DH then covered those spaces with strips of luan (spelling?)
     
  3. TxChiknRanchers

    TxChiknRanchers Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We used styrofoam in the ceiling of our new coop for insulation. It is not exposed, but during construction I had a problem with the "inspectors"
    pecking at the insulation laying on the ground. I suspect they will peck and eat anything exposed.

    Randy
     
  4. Kristina

    Kristina Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 30, 2007
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    Let me tell you about chickens and "great stuff"! Make sure that you don't leave it exposed if you decide to use it. The chickens are in our backyard...the dryer vent that goes outside our house is in the area that we keep our chickens. Well that was sealed with great stuff around cracks. When we put our chickens back there they ate the great stuff like it was a gourmet snack and I had to go trim it excessively. It never killed any of them but I don't reccommend it being visible. It really does work well though [​IMG]
     
  5. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    You can use it, but you can also cut off the excess that expands out from where it's sprayed. And you need to! They will peck at it and eat it. Anything they can peck and eat, they will. Think TODDLER-PROOFING, but toddlers with beaks.
     
  6. rooster-red

    rooster-red Here comes the Rooster

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    Quote:Very good analogy!

    They will pick at any exposed great stuff, but if you trim it then paint it to camoflage it, they won't mess with it.
     
  7. Farmer Kitty

    Farmer Kitty Flock Mistress

    Sep 18, 2007
    Wisconsin
    Quote:[​IMG]
     
  8. PurpleChicken

    PurpleChicken Tolerated.....Mostly

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    Great stuff expands a lot when it cures. You can get it in a "non expanding"
    formula. Just don't put it anywhere where it doesn't have room to expand.
    I had a boss who fill a sheetrock wall with the stuff. It blew out the wall. [​IMG]
    He was an idiot.


    Make sure the chickens can't get to it when it is wet. It is toxic at that point.
    Once hardened I wouldn't worry much.
     
  9. 19maycraft

    19maycraft Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 5, 2007
    Smithfield, NC
    thanks for all the replys...I was really liberal in filling all the cracks, I guess I have a lot of cutting and spray painting to do...Oh by the way...If the stuff gets on your hands look out...It is horrible to get off, I have tried gas, kero, goof off, brillo pads, soaking hands in acetone...and every thing else under the sun...
     
  10. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    It's almost impossible to get off your hands! Ick! There are two types, the regular and the low-expanding, too. Wait, maybe there's also one that is extra-expanding, can't remember. I used it in my coop. If it's where they can't reach, its great, just use the above-mentioned precautions and it's good for sealing up drafts.
     

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