styrofoarm egg carton problem

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by why do birds, Dec 30, 2013.

  1. why do birds

    why do birds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 23, 2013
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    We were hatching 7 shipped eggs, bantams, silkies and sizzles. We tried the Styrofoam egg carton method. cut out the bottoms and positioned the eggs with the air sacks up, big end up. We had 2 successfully hatch, sizzles. A Silkie pipped and zipped at the same time as the sizzle in the egg carton next to it. Humidity was about 55 %. The first to zip practically jumped out of it's shell, and climbed over the other eggs and started running around and peeping loudly. The second sizzle was assisted by the first sizzle and part of the egg shell-the bottom-was stuck to his bottom for a couple of hours. The Silkie seemed to be struggling to remove the egg shell, a Sizzle tried to help but ultimately gave up and helped the other sizzle. The Silkie was peeping. The Silkie shells were very thick and not very porous on candling. The Sizzles had more porous shells. We let it go about 1 1/2 day but when we didn't hear peeps for a while, we decided to remove the Silkie egg. It was partly attached to the Styrofoam egg carton. It was unable to completely zip I believe due to the thickness of the shell. We removed the shell to find a perfectly formed white Silkie, totally absorbed yolk sack, just perfect, broke our hearts. Another Silkie pipped and zipped after these first 3 pipped. This was successfully a beautiful black Silkie chick.
    What we learned from this, the egg carton method is great for more porous eggshell hatches. The thicker the shell, the more possibility of the chick becoming stuck and shell attaching to the Styrofoam. Perhaps the higher the humidity causes the thicker shelled eggs to adhere to the Styrofoam faster.
    We have 3 more eggs with little ones inside at Day 23. No one has peeped or pipped. I've just moved the eggs out of the Styrofoam carton onto the grate. Of the 3 remaining eggs, only the Silkie egg was "stuck" onto the Styrofoam. For incubation a couple of the eggs were older, 9-10 days old, 1 egg in this hatch was 5 days old. Not sure how viable they are due to egg age but want to give them another few days to try to hatch.
    I would say, watch for the thick shells, let them lie in a different container or on the grate. Styrofoam egg carton is best for more porous shells and fresher eggs. Hope this helps someone's future hatch!
     
  2. granny hatchet

    granny hatchet Tastes like chicken Premium Member

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    i am a little lost. hehe, nothing new for me. why do you put them in a egg carton to begin with?
     
  3. why do birds

    why do birds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well, it was our first hatch and we tried to get as much information as we could. We did the egg carton thing because we read that sometimes this helps position the air sacks in a more upright position which may be better for shipped eggs. IDK, we did successfully hatch 3 of 7 viable eggs, 2 of the ones we tried to hatch were 9 and 10 days old, didn't pip. Oddly 4 of the 7 were late deaths, the birds were well formed and 3 failed to pip and 1 got stuck. The membranes looked good too. If we are lucky one of the little darlings that hatched will be a broody hen and will help us hatch a future batch! Wanted to post our experience because in retrospect it does appear that the egg carton thing could be helpful for shipped eggs with saddle air sacks, 3 of ours presented this way on day 18, but the Styrofoam carton may be difficult for eggs that are thick, less porous. We only had them in the egg carton from day 18 onward. We considered a cardboard egg carton but didn't do it because we were worried it would raise humidity too much. We had 1/2 of the eggs with large air sacks and 1/2 of the eggs with small air sacks on day 18, didn't want to drown anyone out. The 3 that hatched were at 55% humidity. We were expecting more uniformity in air sacks at day 18 so this took us by surprise. It appeared that some were more developed than others at this critical stage. We only had 1 incubator to work with. If you have any helpful hatching hints, we would very much welcome them! Are you incubating too?[​IMG]
     
  4. granny hatchet

    granny hatchet Tastes like chicken Premium Member

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    i have hatched a few, i always worried about the pips or the ones hatching knocking the others around. they tell you dont move them when they are trying to hatch and then when some do start they roll them everywhere. i would be worried that the humidity wouldnt be all around the egg in a egg carton so what i did was take some hardware cloth just like the bottom of the bator and cut it into a little roll to put around the unhatched eggs. i left on end with some points on it so it would catch on the bottom wire and smooth on top so they didnt get hurt.it seemed to work out ok. i have 40 eggs stored 3 day supply i am thinking of hatching but i have so many chickens now i dont know what to do with them. lol i just really like hatching. i did try cutting a piece of egg carton one time to put the pip in but it came right back out.
     
  5. why do birds

    why do birds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oh very good point! Humidity surrounding the whole egg. Yes, true, Styrofoam would be a bad material for this, as it's not breathable in the region in which the egg is abutting the Styrofoam. Egg would also have less air and water exchange than if it were on a grate. Very smart idea to make your own egg holders with wire. Thanks for the imput. Now you've got me thinking about materials! It's so nice that you have a big flock! You could sell hatching eggs or baby chicks or even just the eggs that they make! You are blessed indeed!
     
  6. granny hatchet

    granny hatchet Tastes like chicken Premium Member

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    awww, you make me blush.lol i live in the boonies and the people around me only have layers and meat birds. mine are decorations they have never seen before. cant give them away here. i have some beautiful(i think) mixed bantam roos i wish i could find a home for. they are black cochin will mille fleur colors all over them. a lot of hens too. mostly babies.
     
  7. why do birds

    why do birds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oh nice! Lovely! Those Mille Fleur's are so pretty! Your roo's sound very beautiful! Nice mix!

    We didn't know what kind of birds to get. We saw an add for some RIR's, 8 layers with a Roo. We drove an hour drive to see them. These birds were terrified of us and we were terrified of them. After researching we decided on Silkies because of the personalities. We didn't want to get them from a "chicky mill" (like a puppy mill....hahahaha), so tried to hatch some! Now we're hooked!
     
  8. granny hatchet

    granny hatchet Tastes like chicken Premium Member

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    madison Indiana
    gotta watch that chicken math.lol i do have 2 rir hens but i started them from babies eating out of my hand. i do that with all of mine so they stay half tame. i love the silkies and yes, very gentle. my biggest roos are polish and they are very gentle as well. i just finished trimming feathers on my silkies today so they can see. poor things. first one i had was a mess !! i didnt know she couldnt see. she was half starved before i figured it out.that one is always getting in trouble.
     

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