Temperature differences

Victor27

In the Brooder
Sep 7, 2021
10
11
26
Hi everyone!

So since yesterday I've been trying to calibrate my incubator and my problem is this: I set the temperature to 37,8°C on the incubator and it reads 37,8°C with its internal sensor, but I also have an additional hygro-thermometer that reads 36,1°C (it also has a 1°C margin error). So I'm having a hard time deciding which one to trust. If I use the measurement on the hygro-thermometer and elevate it on the incubator display to raise it, I'm afraid that I'll overheat the eggs, but if I leave it as it is and use the incubators temperature on display, I'm afraid I'll have it too low and the embryos won't develope properly. I have the incubator and hygro-thermometer shown in the pictures, and the incubator has a 98 egg capacity.
 

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Lizzy733

Crowing
Nov 13, 2018
1,026
1,844
251
New Zealand
Calibrate one by melting ice half way down in a glass of water and adding the probe. In a minute or so it should settle to freezing. If it is high or low, that will be what you subtract to determine the exact temp it should be.

Once you know what's accurate, pop the probe back in and try it in a few different locations (leave it long enough for the incubator to get back up to temp from opening) middle, sides etc, so you know if there are any cold spots.

Then you'll know everything is perfectly accurate and adjust the Bator temp accordingly.

If it is having trouble 'staying' warm enough, break out the foam from it's packaging and use that as insulation. Keep it in a room with stable temps and away from direct sunlight so things stay consistent.

Good luck!
 

Ridgerunner

Crossing the Road
12 Years
Feb 2, 2009
28,259
23,451
907
Southeast Louisiana
Is your incubator a still air or a forced air? Does it have a fan? Warm air rises. If you have a still air (no fan) the elevation you put the thermometer is very important. In a forced air, it's not. That is one very common problem.

I agree you can't trust any thermometer until it has been calibrated. I like to compare the thermometer with one I know has been calibrated, whether it is one that came with the incubator or one you got separately. If you can find an old medical thermometer used to measure a person's temperature I trust that more than the ice water or boiling water calibration, the calibration temperature is real close to incubation temperature. Plus many thermometers won't measure in the freezing or boiling range.
 

Feathercrazie

Chirping
Jun 3, 2021
60
101
56
Calibrate one by melting ice half way down in a glass of water and adding the probe. In a minute or so it should settle to freezing. If it is high or low, that will be what you subtract to determine the exact temp it should be.

Once you know what's accurate, pop the probe back in and try it in a few different locations (leave it long enough for the incubator to get back up to temp from opening) middle, sides etc, so you know if there are any cold spots.

Then you'll know everything is perfectly accurate and adjust the Bator temp accordingly.

If it is having trouble 'staying' warm enough, break out the foam from it's packaging and use that as insulation. Keep it in a room with stable temps and away from direct sunlight so things stay consistent.

Good luck!
you can calibrate a thermometer by boiling alcohol in a double boiler. Alcohol boils at 100 degrees. You have to be careful to not let the alcohol fumes come in contact with the flames as it is flammable. DO NOT COVER THE BOILER. You bring it to a boil with the thermometer in the alcohol then turn the heat off. Record the temperature at that point. the difference between 100 degrees and your reading is how much to offset.
 

Feathercrazie

Chirping
Jun 3, 2021
60
101
56
Forgot to tell you to use water in the lower half of the double boiler. It is important not to cover the boiler as this will raise the pressure which raises the boiling temperature of the alcohol. Open air boiling the temperature will stay the same until all alcohol is boiled out. This should be done in a well ventilated area as fumes can cause dizziness and even blackout. The water will be 212 degrees when alcohol starts boiling, because the steam is heating the bottom of the boiler. Be sure to turn the heat source off immediately when the alcohol starts boiling and remove the boiler from the lower half as soon as you record the temperature, as the alcohol will keep boiling.
 

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