Thinking about Nigerian Dwarf Goats....

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by HbbyFrmGrl, Oct 11, 2012.

  1. HbbyFrmGrl

    HbbyFrmGrl Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 10, 2012
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    I am thinking about taking the next step on our mini farm and getting another useful form of livestock. After doing a ton of research I have decided on Nigerian Dwarf Goats. They are smaller and easy to handle, they produce good milk, you only have to milk once a day, they kid well, and they are adorable! So far I have experience with Horses, Dogs, Cats, Chickens, and miniature donkeys.

    I love the taste of goat milk and want to make soap, cheese, and butter from their milk as well. I will most likely look to purchase in the spring. I am looking at getting one Grown milker and two doelings to get a handle on things before I expand.

    I would love any input from any experienced goat owners because there are some things that you just can't find in books or articles. Thanks!!
     
  2. moomoodiddy

    moomoodiddy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    i love goats i have a expecting boer goat!!!!!! ive heard that bigger dual purpose goats are worth more so if ur planning on saling any u may want to choose a more valuable goat but if ur not i think great i love dwarfs they r sooooooooo small and cute!!!
     
  3. HbbyFrmGrl

    HbbyFrmGrl Out Of The Brooder

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    I do not have it in me to rase livestock for meat so the only thing I will be using them for is milk and love [​IMG]. I am also thinking about Nubians but want to start with a small easy breed to see if I want to get into it more seriously.
     
  4. Pearce Pastures

    Pearce Pastures Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I love our NDs. They have great personalities, come in more colors than you could count, and their milk is amazing! Our fam of five is kept in milk by having two in milk at a time and we always have more than enough milk. Their small size makes them easy to handle, they take up less room than other diary breeds, they eat less, and are perfect for children to handle. Their milk is also very high in butterfat making it perfect for cheese making.
     
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  5. moomoodiddy

    moomoodiddy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dont u have to process the milk
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2012
  6. HbbyFrmGrl

    HbbyFrmGrl Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks Pearce! Thats just why I have been wanting NDs. Your post pretty much confermed my thoughts on the breed. I have researched until my eyes almost fell out and I wanted some first hand opinions! I am not even worried about their small teats because I have super small hands [​IMG]

    What kind of housing and milking areas do you have? That is my next project to tackle!

    And no you do not have to process the milk as long as you keep clean and sanatised milking conditions.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2012
  7. Stacykins

    Stacykins Overrun With Chickens

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    Aww, please do share pictures when you get your goaties! Are you thinking of starting with kids, or getting adults?

    I have three Nigerians, a doe, a doeling, and a buck, plus the buck's boer wether buddy. One thing I recommend is definitely read all you can about goat health and maladies. Don't let it scare you, as it will definitely come in handy if you ever do have a problem!


    You can pasteurize the milk. But you don't HAVE to. Even pasteurized milk will be no good if collected in an unsanitary fashion. For instance, if a goat puts their dirty foot in the milk bucket, the milk needs to either get tossed, or can be fed right away to an animal who can eat it (pigs relish milk as a treat, as an example). You can also still use it in soapmaking, too.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2012
  8. HbbyFrmGrl

    HbbyFrmGrl Out Of The Brooder

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    I am thinking about trying for a Doe and two Doelings to start. That way I can get accustomed to the milking and handling of a mature doe while working with the doelings so that I am more experienced by the time we need to breed the doelings. Eventually I want my own buck, but am unsure if I want to start out with one or wait a while. I also need to set up separate areas if I do get a buck.

    I am hoping to get my kids in the spring [​IMG]

    I am looking for a breeder near me now and will definitely post pictures when I get them!
     
  9. Pearce Pastures

    Pearce Pastures Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Some don't treat their milk because they like it raw and goat milk, as long as you use clean buckets and wash udders, is less likely to harbor anything that would cause illness than cow milk. However, I still pasteurize mine and it is incredibly easy to do (takes less than 5 minutes to do). It does not change the flavor unless you actually burn the milk when heating it.


    As for the small teats, if you get a ND from someone who raises and breeds them for milk, their teats are not that bad at all. Mine milk very easily (the pygmy is a bit more challenging but she is a meat goat afterall but don't tell her).

    I agree with you on holding off on a buck. We waited a long time before getting one. They do need seperate housing, especially if you are going to be milking and don't want buck-flavored milk (that smell gets onto and into everything). And x2 on what Stacykins said. Read a lot about the nutrional needs and care for a goat and be familiar with the illnesses you might encounter before getting them but do not let that stuff scare you. It is just good to know so that if and when a problem arises, you already are prepared for a course of action.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2012
  10. HbbyFrmGrl

    HbbyFrmGrl Out Of The Brooder

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    I will make sure i bone up on my goat ailment research! I didn't want to get a buck but I have not found any breeders in my close area so i am unsure how to get my does bred every year...
     

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