Ticks and Chicks or Can I use Seven Dust in the yard?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Raising Reds, Jun 8, 2009.

  1. Raising Reds

    Raising Reds In the Brooder

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    Jan 9, 2009
    North Carolina
    We have ticks bad this year in my part of North Carolina. Really bad. I've heard that chickens will eat ticks but mine are only free ranging for an hour or so a day and they're not keeping up with the number our back yard contains.

    One of my dogs got Lyme disease last year and I don't want to go through that again with a dog, or even worse, a person. That's one scary disease.

    So, if I put Seven dust or another tick-killing product out in the yard is it going to hurt my chickens when they free range? Is there a particular product that effectively kills ticks but won't harm chickens? Will I need to keep them in their run for a certain amount of time after dusting (or using granules or whatever) the yard but then it would be safe to let them out again?

    I can keep them in their run all for a week or two if need be. They won't like it but they'll learn to deal with it.
     
  2. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Free Ranging

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    Feb 2, 2009
    Southeast Louisiana
    I'm not going to get into the right or wrong about using any poison. I consider that strictly your business and none of mine as long as the poison stays on your property. I understand the concern about Lyme disease.

    I don't know about your specific application, but I'd use the liquid Sevin to spray as opposed to any dust. The application will be a lot easier and, if you pick a time when the wind is down, drift will be a lot less. I'd also suggest doing it just before dark to keep from killing the bees. The ticks will still be there. They won't fly away. The Sevin will kill othe rinsects as well. Another possible product is Malathion.

    You can use vegetables a day or so after spraying with Sevin, so I'd expect it to be OK with your chickens, but you normally wash the vegetables that have been sprayed. The green stuff the chickens eat will not have been washed. I would not be real comfortable letting them graze for a couple of days, but that is just me.

    I'd suggest calling your county cooperative extension agent (in the phone book under county government or online). They can give you expert advise on how to control the ticks and the risks of various methods. They should be able to tell you if your chickens can safely eat after spraying and if the eggs are safe to eat. It is unliklely the agent will personally know the best methods, but they can put you in touch with experts at no cost to you.

    Good luck!
     
  3. gumpsgirl

    gumpsgirl Crowing

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    I wouldn't put it out. To me, it would be to risky. Not only for the chicks, but the dogs too.

    I live in VA, right on the border of NC and we are having the same problems you are with the ticks. I bought some Bio-Spot to treat my dogs with (it seems to work pretty good!) and we all steer clear of the tall grass and weeds in the woods for now. Wish I could give you a better solution. The ticks are a pain. [​IMG]
     
  4. Raising Reds

    Raising Reds In the Brooder

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    Jan 9, 2009
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    Quote:I've never used it before because my husband (what does DH stand for?) and I always had a live and let live attitude towards all the bugs in the yard. But after seeing what Lyme disease can do and having so many ticks this year that we have even found a couple of them in the house we have to do something.

    I like the night use idea. We normally get bees in the clover (our "grass" is mostly weeds) but after mowing they wander off. I'll mow and then use whatever we decide on that night so that the bees are hopefully all gone.
     
  5. Raising Reds

    Raising Reds In the Brooder

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    Quote:We have a property near Henry (Franklin County) and the ticks are so bad up there that we're not going at all this summer. Our last trip we cleared some brush. Even with long sleeve shirts and pants and having sprayed Deep Woods Off on ourselves we came back home with multiple ticks. And that's not counting the ones we pulled off and burned while up there.

    *sigh* I seriously don't like parasitic bugs.
     
  6. Smmcdn

    Smmcdn In the Brooder

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    Feb 3, 2009
    Drummonds TN
    The thing I found is Permethrin*10. I use this on everything even my chickens. I got it from the co-op here in Tipton County and it works on everything just follow directions.
     
  7. I would agree with using liquid Sevin over the dust. I live in NC and had a real problem in 2005 and uses several applications of liquid Sevin and not only rarely do I find a tick. They make a sprayer with Sevin that you attach to the hose. Spray at dusk. It might take several applications to really knock them out. Good luck !!
     
  8. gumpsgirl

    gumpsgirl Crowing

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    Quote:We have a property near Henry (Franklin County) and the ticks are so bad up there that we're not going at all this summer. Our last trip we cleared some brush. Even with long sleeve shirts and pants and having sprayed Deep Woods Off on ourselves we came back home with multiple ticks. And that's not counting the ones we pulled off and burned while up there.

    *sigh* I seriously don't like parasitic bugs.

    I'm in Henry Co., so I know exactly what you're talking about!

    Have you checked into getting some Guinea Hens? They do great with wiping out tick populations! I have some on my list once I am finished hatching and brooding chicks. [​IMG]
     
  9. thebritt

    thebritt Songster

    Mar 5, 2009
    Humboldt County
    If you want to get awesome tick-eaters, get Guinnea fowl. They're voracious tick consumers, though a little psycho as well. Just my $.02.
     
  10. Raising Reds

    Raising Reds In the Brooder

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    Quote:I love Guineas. My grandmother had them and they make great watchdogs.

    Unfortunately (or fortunately depending on how you look at it) my property is unmanned 90% of the time. We built a small cabin for weekends/hunting/vacations but I don't have any way to keep fowl there. Since we've seen bear sign I wouldn't give them even much chance to roam about on their own without getting killed or wandering off. If only the wild turkeys would work on those ticks!
     

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