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Topic of the Week - Dogs and chickens

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by sumi, Oct 9, 2016.

  1. Chickiedoodle19

    Chickiedoodle19 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 13, 2016
    We have 3 dogs who get alone great with our girls. They each kind of just mind their own business. When we got our girls they were chicks and we made sure that they had a lot of human interaction so they were out of the brooder a lot well we held them. The dogs eventually came to the realization that the chickens were 1. Here to stay and 2. Part of the family. The dogs and chickens get alone fine and we can let them both out in the yard at the same time. Occasionally our retriever/lab with sniff around the edge of the coop and he always goes out to check on his girls first thing in the morning before anything else. :) they're just distant best friends who respect each other's space
     
  2. Braxton Brigade

    Braxton Brigade Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Braxton, Ms


    Agree with all of you on your opinions and methods.
     
  3. Braxton Brigade

    Braxton Brigade Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG]
    Bi colored Australian Shepherd; 5 y/o (Male)
    Zach was the second easiest to acclimate to the chickens, and clearly he is good at looking out for his flock.
    The basics I used to teach my two younger dogs was to avoid, ignore and absolutely respect the chickens,
    I recommend having a extremely reliable "leave it" and "settle"/ "easy" command; "settle" / "easy" is a command that means I want my dogs to calm down or move slowly. Usually my dogs lie down when I give that command off leash, on leash it just means slow down.
    I used those commands when the dogs were navigating around the flock or when a bird make a sudden movement/noise.

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    Labrador Retriever X Border Collie; 13 y/o (Male)
    Isaac was the easiest to introduce to the chickens, he will hang out with the chickens for hours.
    A few years ago he mauled by a bob cat (he was around 6 y/o at the time), since then we have made a conscious effort to keep all our animals within a fence or building when it is dark out.

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    Redbone Coonhound; 5 y/o (Female)
    Zoey was way more intrigued by the chickens... too intrigued.
    It took approx. 3 months to get her reliable around the birds whilst off leash.
    We had to be much more strict with her, she was absolutely not allowed to sniff, watch or move towards the chickens.
    I would put her on a leash and make her walk around the flock repeatedly until she lost interest.
    This was not a easy task even as a obedient dog, being trained well beforehand is super important.
     
  4. Braxton Brigade

    Braxton Brigade Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Braxton, Ms
    I'm going to be obnoxious and add another tip.

    I would highly recommend having your dog well exercised before being exposed to the chickens, this will minimize their excitement.
    Personally I bike with my dogs, I actually bikejor when the weather is good outside, this has a huge benefit. My dogs trust my commands even when they are pulling me on a bike, they have learned that when I ask them to ignore something it is so we can continue having fun.
     
    4 people like this.
  5. Cynthia12

    Cynthia12 Always Grateful Premium Member

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    I have three dogs around my little flock. I can leave them out with them no problem. Except, that the hens will chase my little Dachshund. :p I've only had one dog that was older when I started keeping chickens. The Golden R. and the Dachshund were young when they came along..the Schnoodle was watched for a while, and told no no chickens. That's all it took for him.


    Brody, our Piebald in coloring..Dachshund. He runs from them.
    [​IMG]


    Schnoodle. He doesn't bother them. They don't bother him. lol
    [​IMG]


    Missy, our Golden R. Love having her out there when I've seen hawks fly over.
    [​IMG]


    She doesn't like sharing her apples though. But yeah, Reba got a bite.
    [​IMG]


    Now she's sneaking their treats I'm throwing out to them.
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]



    One chicken preening, and one laying with her wings out sunbathing with Missy right there,
    at the back door. They all beg for treats at the back door.
    [​IMG]


    That window is never clean when she is out there. This is my third Golden around my
    chickens. All were great with them.
    [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. angel2013

    angel2013 Out Of The Brooder

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    May 17, 2013
    Hope, bc Canada
    I have a Burmese mountain dog cross, he was introduced to the chickens through their pen, then I decided to keep him on a leash for the first while, then I made him lay down and was close they walked around him etc... he would wine cause all he wants to do is sniff them. But he isn't allowed. I let them roam, he hangs now never bothering them. I am getting a puppy soon and it will get the same training. [​IMG]
     
  7. JMcGrath

    JMcGrath New Egg

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    Jul 29, 2014
    I introduced my current dogs at 6 weeks to chickens with the chickens in a covered run and gradually let the chickens out for longer periods to free range, while I was around to supervise. If I thought the dogs were starting to stare at the chickens too long I would distract them and take their attention elsewhere. The chickens now free range all day and I always make sure the dogs are out with them as they patrol the boundary hedges and chase away vermin.l don't supervise any more.
    I do think breed is important and possibly the dog's origin - pet or pastoral. I previously owned an Irish Setter and she was impossible around any livestock because of her prey drive. Currently I have 2 male collieX dogs, acquired at 6 weeks. The mother was a working sheepdog who produced an 'accidental' litter that was sent to the pound due to the father being unknown. The more collie type of the 2 is a natural LGD he will not come in if the chickens are out, even if called, and always makes sure he has a clear line of sight to them when they are free ranging and chivvies them out of the hedges if they all go in together.
     
  8. jhopp6

    jhopp6 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Algoma, Wisconsin
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    I have a 5# poodle mix that LOVES her baby chickies. She inspects them all (with supervision of course) and freely gives kisses. All goes well until the chickens are bigger than she is - an occasional peck on the nose, and then she steers clear [​IMG]
     
  9. jhopp6

    jhopp6 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 8, 2014
    Algoma, Wisconsin
    [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. adotrat

    adotrat New Egg

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    May 25, 2014
    Hanover, MA
    I have had German shepherds and can leave them out all day unsupervised while chickens free range. They could care less. Chickens aren't afraid of the shepherds. I have a little puggle that gets bored and will chase them from time to time but doesn't harm them.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2016

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