Traumatized Chicken

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by StellaStewart, Jun 10, 2017.

  1. StellaStewart

    StellaStewart Out Of The Brooder

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    There was an attack on my coop, only one chicken made it, and there are only feathers left behind. The poor baby is traumatized and I don't know what to do! Right now she is sitting on a blanket safely in the mud room, but she doesn't want to move, eat or drink and she is breathing with her mouth open. I have been sitting in there with her for a while but now I have to get some rest too. Is there anything I can do to clam her?
     
  2. nightowl223

    nightowl223 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If you have a small kennel, with enough room for her, a little feeder and little waterer, fill it with a layer of wood chip litter, tuck her inside it, and cover the sides/back of it. Or perhaps a box you can do the same thing with, and cover it. She needs a cozy, dark, comfortable place that feels safe to her. I know what you're going through, as I had a survivor of an attack on one of my coops be traumatized like that. It took her awhile, but she finally acted like nothing ever happened - except she refused to use that coop. Can't say I blame her.
     
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  3. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Sorry to hear about your flock.
    Do you know what attacked them?

    It sound like she is in shock. Placing her in a semi-dark, quiet area as @nightowl223 is a good idea.

    Provide some electrolytes if you have them - hydration is important. When you've had some rest and she's settled a bit, encourage drinking. Check her over carefully for any wounds that may be hidden under the feathers.

    Let us know how she is doing.
     
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  4. StellaStewart

    StellaStewart Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks she is drinking and eating this morning so I think she will be fine! I'm pretty sure it was a raccoon, we saw the survivor attacking the creature and when we opened the door and ran outside the creature ran off so we didn't acutely get to see it close up. Thanks for the ideas!
     
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  5. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    I'm glad to hear she is doing better:)
     
  6. StellaStewart

    StellaStewart Out Of The Brooder

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    I am concerned about the raccoon coming back! Raccoons would not come in the day right? And will my survivor be lonely? I won't be able to get any more birds for a while, and even when I do get more will she get along with them?
     
  7. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Yes, you need to be concerned that it will come back and yes, it can come during the day. Most of the time raccoons are nocturnal, but...they can be moving during the day as well.

    Chickens are flock animals and do well having a couple of buddies. So she will be lonely.
    When you can, it would be a good idea to get a few more, then slowly begin the integration process. She may be tickled to have other chickens around, but remember they are coming on her turf. Chicks that grow up together may also view her as an intruder. The best way to introduce chickens to one another is the see-but-don't-touch method. Housing them next to each other for a period of time let them get used to each other. There may still be some standoffs, pecking and posturing to establish pecking order, but if there is no pinning down/knock down drag-outs, let them settle it themselves.

    Also, if you do get adult chickens to re-start your flock, you may want to "quarantine" them for a couple of weeks to observe them for any illness, parasites, etc. Even though she is alone, birds can transmit illness to each other.

    fwiw - trying to get your housing and fencing secured against predators would be a good idea as well. Raccoons are quite savvy and strong.

    http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2011/06/integrating-new-flock-members-playpen.html
    http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2012/12/quarantine-of-backyard-chickens-why-and.html
     
  8. StellaStewart

    StellaStewart Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you!
     
  9. veramadera

    veramadera Just Hatched

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    I'm so glad your chicken is doing better! I had a duck that had the unfortunate experience of being a sole survivor, too. She was so unhappy on her own that I sent her to a friend's home, to be with their flock, until I could get more birds. In the end, she was so happy there that I never did take her back.... she's still there, living a great life.
     

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