URGENT!!! Dog attacked chicken. How do I treat the wound?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by WoodChic, Jun 1, 2010.

  1. WoodChic

    WoodChic The Chic Chick

    Oct 27, 2009
    KKV HQ
    We have had allot of trouble keeping our dog away from the chickens. She has already killed 2. [​IMG] Well yesterday she attacked one of our golden comets. We managed to get her off of the chicken, but tonight my brother noticed the chicken couldn't get onto the roost. Upon closer inspection we saw a wound somewhere (I don't know all the details. I myself haven't seen the chicken), and were wondering what are some good oils or first aid we can give her? Also, it is 57 degrees outside, and supposed to get to 52 tonight. We have an un-insulated coop with 12 other chickens. Will she be warm enough, and do we need to confine her? Some of the other chickens are pretty mean, and i'm worried they might beat up on her. [​IMG]
    Thank you!!!!!

    UPDATE!:
    Thanks for the quick responses!

    Ok, I got more info:

    The wound is pretty much directly on her back, and is pretty big. It looks like a beef roast uncooked. [​IMG] We would isolate her, but we can't find our dog carrier (which we usually put the chickens in), our brooder is a no-no for many reasons, and we just can't find anything to put her in. [​IMG]

    We washed the wound and sprayed "lava-derm" on it ( a mix of lavender and aloe-vera). That should hopefully help.
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2010
  2. AdrieeC

    AdrieeC Pink Roses Farm

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    Mar 14, 2010
    Pearl River
    I am dealing with a dog injured chicken myself. It is probably best to isolate her from the flock, especially if some of the birds are reputed to be mean. I have been instructed to clean the wound with 16 oz water and 1 tbsp vinegar to help with disinfecting, it doesn't seem to bother the chicken over much. Further treatment may depend upon what kind of wound it is and the location. Hopefully someone can provide more detailed instructions.
     
  3. CrazyFowlFreak

    CrazyFowlFreak Pine Hill Farm

    Apr 24, 2009
    WV
    I would separate her, at least to keep her quiet, safe, and calm. I'll let others help you with wound care as I am no help in that department.
     
  4. WoodChic

    WoodChic The Chic Chick

    Oct 27, 2009
    KKV HQ
    Thanks for the quick responses!

    Ok, I got more info:

    The wound is pretty much directly on her back, and is pretty big. It looks like a beef roast uncooked. [​IMG] We would isolate her, but we can't find our dog carrier (which we usually put the chickens in), our brooder is a no-no for many reasons, and we just can't find anything to put her in. [​IMG]

    We washed the wound and sprayed "lava-derm" on it ( a mix of lavender and aloe-vera). That should hopefully help. [​IMG]
     
  5. WoodChic

    WoodChic The Chic Chick

    Oct 27, 2009
    KKV HQ
    Just found out the wound is about 1' x 2'
     
  6. WoodChic

    WoodChic The Chic Chick

    Oct 27, 2009
    KKV HQ
    Ok, we put her in a cardboard box in our basement for the night. She has food, water, and hay for bedding. My bro says she is looking allot perkier, though the wound doesn't look any better. We are planning on keeping her inconfinement until she mostly heals. I will try and post pictures later today or tomorrow!
     
  7. MotherJean

    MotherJean Chillin' With My Peeps

    Animal bites are highly infectious. It's important that you wash that wound with an antibacterial. I recommend 5% hydrogen peroxide as an initial wound wash. When the bubbling stops, gently blot the wound with a gauze pad and apply a liberal dressing of Triple Antibiotic Ointment (which is a dead cheap generic antibiotic readily available in the first-aid section of most grocery stores).

    You were smart to separate the hen from the flock as they will pick at her wounds and cause more damage. It also means that you won't have to try to bandage the wound. It would be good if you could put her in an open cage or wire pen by herself where she can get a little sunshine. The UV rays are a natural antibiotic/antibacterial and very healing.
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2010

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