vent size for air circ?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by chickensista, Apr 3, 2008.

  1. chickensista

    chickensista Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 23, 2008
    CT
    Hi,
    How big do the vents need to be for an 8x10 coop? I was planning on 2, opposite sides, measuring about 2x10. Is that big enough for air circ in the winter?(to help get moisture out) There will be 4 windows, so summer isn't an issue.
    Thanks!
    Terry
     
  2. twigg

    twigg Cooped up

    Mar 2, 2008
    Tulsa
    Quote:*If* I were doing it I would first try full ridge ventilation at the highest point of the roof.

    In wall works, but make it big, and make it adjustable. Keep it higher than the roosting birds and think about draught exclusion.

    So .... 10" deep would work, but make it 4 ft long, with a sliding cover.

    Birds do not mind cold ... they get sick rapidly in damp, and they hate draughts.
     
  3. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Ontario, Canada
    Three problems with ridge vents: a) they let in snow (=moisture), b) they can't easily be blocked off, and c) they do not provide much actual air movement, unless you have other vents lower down and get a rising air circulation going. Personally I would not use a ridge vent for a coop, I think there are better ways of doing it (they're great for other kinds of buildings, mind you).

    If "2x10" is in *feet*, then that is *plenty* of ventilation and it'll be important to design a series of flaps so that you can close off part but not all of it. In particular it's really important not to have an incoming breeze aimed right at the roost.

    If OTOH 2x10 means inches, then it is not nearly enough.

    Somewhere in between is probably the most sensible [​IMG]

    Good luck,

    Pat
     
  4. twigg

    twigg Cooped up

    Mar 2, 2008
    Tulsa
    Three problems with ridge vents: a) they let in snow (=moisture), b) they can't easily be blocked off, and c) they do not provide much actual air movement, unless you have other vents lower down and get a rising air circulation going. Personally I would not use a ridge vent for a coop, I think there are better ways of doing it (they're great for other kinds of buildings, mind you).

    None of this is true, I'm afraid [​IMG]

    Ridge vents have been standard in poultry housing the World over for generations.

    They are good precisely because they don't induce much air-circulation ..... air circulation is called *draughty* where I come from.

    Outside ANY chicken house there is air movement, from the lightest breeze to a tornado (we don't want those). As the air moves over the ridge vent, it is moving faster than the air inside the vent, so the venturi effect pulls air out. The first air it pulls out is the warmer, moister air that has risen.

    This is the perfect solution.

    They need to be positioned so that the prevailing wind doesn't blow straight in, and the wind side can very easily be baffled to prevent blowing snow.

    So ... two opinions ... make yer own mind up [​IMG]
     
  5. chickensista

    chickensista Chillin' With My Peeps

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    In wall works, but make it big, and make it adjustable. Keep it higher than the roosting birds and think about draught exclusion

    Hi Twigg,
    The coop is a shed kit,(it would take me all year to build something myself) and the vents are at the highest point of the structure. They are covered with material(didn't take a close look), but there won't be any snow coming in between that and the roof overhang. Unless there are nasty winds...
    I can easily enough make a moveable cover inside if we expecting particularly nasty, windy weather.

    If OTOH 2x10 means inches, then it is not nearly enough.

    Pat,
    Its in inches! I guess I'll go with the bigger vents and make a moveable cover inside. They will be on the West/East sides so it might too much on windy, wintery days.
    Personally I would not use a ridge vent for a coop

    What would you do?
    Thanks for the replies!
    Terry​
     
  6. twigg

    twigg Cooped up

    Mar 2, 2008
    Tulsa
    I like your thinking ChickenSista .... keep getting ideas.

    As for advice, I have a rule about Internet advice:

    Take what you need, and leave the rest
     
  7. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Quote:None of this is true, I'm afraid [​IMG]

    I'm VERY familiar with ridge vents, twigg, I've worked in more horse barns than you can count and the great majority have had ridge vents. Possibly in snowier climates than yours, I don't know. In a serious snowstorm with howling winds, they *do* let snow sift in, really truly. The air circulation I was talking about was between the inside and outside of the building (a better term would probably have been air *exchange*), and ridge vents are not a great means of accomplishing it. And I can't imagine how you could baffle one side of 'em since they're, you know, along the ridge. I'm not sure whehter you're talking about the turbine-style ones or the plain ol' vented cap that runs all along the ridge, but either way, I can't see how...

    <pause>

    ....er, are you really talking about *ridge* vents, or do you mean vents under the eaves or at the gable ends? Which, yes, *are* pretty standard on old-fashioned (i.e. well built) chicken coops, and *can* be baffled or even one side closed when you get a storm, and *are* good features.

    So ... two opinions ... make yer own mind up [​IMG]

    I'd agree with that [​IMG]


    Pat​
     
  8. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    chickensista,

    it sounds like the vents are at the top of the gable ends? I like that kind of venting, personally -- you get good air flow thru the coop but it's not aimed at the chickens. I'd enlarge them somewhat (or add a second vent on each side under the first, whichever is easier) and you should be good, if you ask me.

    Have fun,

    Pat
     
  9. chickensista

    chickensista Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 23, 2008
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    ....er, are you really talking about *ridge* vents, or do you mean vents under the eaves or at the gable ends? Which, yes, *are* pretty standard on old-fashioned (i.e. well built) chicken coops, and *can* be baffled or even one side closed when you get a storm, and *are* good features

    OK, maybe this is my fault - I'm not familiar with all the terms/types of vents. What I'm looking at are gable vents.
    I know I need air exchange to get the humidity out. So I'm leaning towards the 2 larger gable vents. I'll rig something up from the inside to block them during the cold and windy days.
    The large vents look to be around 10inchesx10inches.

    Twigg and Pat - I'm hoping to get this right the first time. Any other thoughts?

    Thank you both!
    Terry​
     
  10. CritterHill

    CritterHill Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 3, 2008
    SE PA
    Ah! A ventilation thread, perfect.

    DH and I are having arguments about the amount of ventilation required... We are in the process of building and he feels that the two 2x2 windows (on the east and south sides) are sufficient. Simply leave them open a crack in the winter.

    He did make a small measurement error and end up with a 2 inch gap at the front top wall right under where the roof overhang will be which I _think_ I have convinced him to leave open and just put wire over...

    Anyway, pics are here:

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=43160

    I would love a couple other opinions of what else we need to do to make the ventilation sufficient.
     

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