vets?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by 3chicksandaboy, Apr 2, 2007.

  1. 3chicksandaboy

    3chicksandaboy New Egg

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    Apr 1, 2007
    Oregon City
    My son just picked out his FIRST three chicks (3 different breed layers? pets) at the Farm & Ranch store for his 13th birthday. We should have done the research first but oh well (we did the same with our rabbit). I am lucky to have found this site to read great info on chickens, however, I didn't think about parasites or diseases so my question is... do you need to have a vet for chickens? And if so, what qualifications or kind do you look for?
    What other kinds of vitamins do they need that is not in the feed they sold me?
    I found a Great domestic rabbit group that has meetings once a month, learning about health, habits and GOOD rabbit vets and hope to find the same for chickens.
    Are there any groups or other members reading this, that are located in Oregon City, OR?

    "3 chicks and a boy"
    I appreciate your help!!!
     
  2. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    I think your best bet will be an avian vet. Good luck.
     
  3. chix

    chix Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 12, 2007
    Quote:you don't need to bring your chickens to the vet like you would a dog or cat, however you may want to research local vets in your area and see who works with chickens because most don't. i have used vet services in the past when i had a few of my chickens attacked by a racoon and having the # on hand would be useful.
     
  4. chickbea

    chickbea Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 18, 2007
    Vermont
    Very few vets have experience with chickens, even agricultural vets who spend most of their time on farms. Even fewer vets have experience with the rather new phenomenon of people looking at the health of their birds as individuals, rather than as a flock. In veterinary school they were mainly taught to treat flocks of birds for diseases, not individual birds. Until very recently culling was the general method recommended for any bird that wasn't 100% healthy.
    Silkiechick's advice of an avian vet is good, although most of those will be costly, and will probably consider your chicken an "exotic pet". Any vet can do parasite testing for you, however.
     
  5. SpottedCrow

    SpottedCrow Flock Goddess

    If you have a local "Wildlife" center, that may be useful too. I know the one near me had chickens at one point AND they take care of wildbirds too.
     
  6. poppycat

    poppycat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 26, 2007
    There is an Avain vet in Lake Oswego. They will do a fecal float test, if you need one, and you don't even have to bring in your bird, just the poop. I don't know what else they do chicken wise though, and I hope I don't need to find out anytime soon. Their phone number is 503-635-5672. They were recomended on the City Chicken website also.
     
  7. equine chick

    equine chick Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 9, 2007
    pennsylvania
    I would definetely recommend contacting your local 4h group. They have a group for learning about poultry/rabbits and many other things. They will also have ideas about a local vet ect.
     
  8. 3chicksandaboy

    3chicksandaboy New Egg

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    Apr 1, 2007
    Oregon City
    Thank you to all who are giving me their input!

    I will try to find a 4H group because in reading some of the other forum q's, I've discovered I don't know all of the chicken parts! In cold weather the chicken with 1 or 2 "thingys" that can get frostbite? Is there a diagram on this site?
    I feel stupid and have a LOT to learn! :rolleyes:4H or vet - help!

    chickbea thanks for responding to my email, I will try to find out more on the vitamins. (cute bunny!!!!)

    Peeps!
    3chicksandaboy
     
  9. girlsnboys

    girlsnboys Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 30, 2007
    Whidbey Island, WA
    You can also contact your local extension office. They should be able to direct you to resources for your area.
     

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