1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Weapons Survey...

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by thunderkitty, May 8, 2007.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. thunderkitty

    thunderkitty Out Of The Brooder

    Okay, I hope no one takes this the wrong way, but our family is debating whether buying a rifle to protect the homestead is a good idea. How many of you own one for this purpose?[​IMG] and maybe some of you wise older chicken owners [​IMG] can tell me whether a 5 acre homestead in the midwest plains would need one (we have skunks, hawks, ETC.) or whether I should just learn to run fast ?[​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2007
  2. 65browneyes

    65browneyes Chillin' With My Peeps

    734
    9
    161
    Mar 2, 2007
    Arizona
    I've been trying to steer clear of threads that could wreak controversy. However..... dangerous as we all know guns can and will be in the wrong hands.......

    The men in my family are hunters, and my children have always been around guns. They know about them, they've shot them, they've cleaned them, and they know the power of a gun. They know people kill animals and other people with guns.

    They know when they have friends over, "we don't have guns here". We also have a rule that nobody comes over unless an adult is here with them, anyway.

    They also know where the guns are (locked in the gun safe), they do NOT have ready access to the guns, nor do they have access to ammunition.

    And they darn well know if need be, predators (and I'm talking coyotes, skunks, etc.) WILL be shot for any attempt at my kids, my chickens, my dogs, etc.

    My opinion, bottom line, if you know how to handle a gun, you're comfortable with a gun, you RESPECT guns, and you teach your children the power and danger of a gun, by all means get one.

    BUT, if you have fear of guns, or don't take the time to learn and teach your children about the dangers of guns, they're best left at the gun shop.

    Let me also add that in today's electronic society, what with video games, computer games and the internet, we've become a generation of complacency. I beleive there is a vast number of children and young adults who think getting shot would be no sweat, just like in the games. Just get this coin or that weapon, and you get more life. That being said, introducing guns to those totally unfamiliar with them would require a great deal of preparation and education.

    Just MY opinion.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 8, 2007
  3. thunderkitty

    thunderkitty Out Of The Brooder

    Thanks Chicken-mamma. I agree that this is kind of a controversial issue. I just want everyone reading this to know though that this is sheerly a question of predator protection for my family. IF I do get a gun of any kind it will be locked, unloaded, and I will be learning about it far in advance to it's purchase, as I feel all people should. I [​IMG] that this thread doesn't become a debate, because I didn't post it for that purpose. I just want to know if those who have dealt with predators feel that a gun would benefit in "combating" this problem. Especially since I live in an area prone to things like hawks and animals with sharp teeth that I would never be able to physically deter like I may be able to with things like cats, and household animals.
     
  4. Davaroo

    Davaroo Poultry Crank

    5,535
    67
    308
    Feb 4, 2007
    Leesville, SC
    Why would something like this become a reason for debate and excitement? I own several rifles and after a lifetime of firearms use, I feel there is nothing controversial about guns at all - only people make them so. In and of themselves they are supremely useful tools and shooting is an enjoyable pastime. Proper care, respect and training will be vital, though, if you are unfamiliar with them and/or you have small children about.

    Im of the opinion that you SHOULD have at least a rifle, as it can do several things:

    1. Protect your livestock. Your predators will determine the caliber.
    2. Provide the occasional meal for YOU. Venison is tasty, inexpensive protein. Likewise other wild game.
    3. Protect you from 2-legged predators. In truth, this is seldom an issue, but when it becomes one - little else will suffice.

    The farm battery should actually consist of 3 basic firearms. Here's some recommendations:

    A. Shotgun.
    Possbily the most versatile of guns and should be purchased first. I suggest a Mossberg pump 12 ga. with two barrels:
    - Standard 26" field barrel with interchangeable chokes tubes in, Improved cylinder, Modified and Full.
    - Rifled slug barrel
    Ammuniton for shotguns is as varied as you want it to be and beyond. Properly loaded with the right ammo, you can take anything from squirrels to deer and do a "bang up" job of protecting your homestead from felonious human assault, if needs be. Few bad guys will tempt fate when facing a 12 ga.

    B. Rifle
    Like all tools, there is no one gun for every purpose. The best all around rifle would be a bolt action in a medium caliber. I suggest .308 WIN or 7MM Mauser if you expect to hunt larger game like deer. The first caliber is as common as flies, is loaded in many variations, from pipsqueek to moosebusting loads and can allow you to reach out well past 150 yds if needed. The second is lighter in recoil and willl do about as well as the first, although ammo is a little harder to come by at the local corner store.
    If you intend only to dispatch things like coyotes and the like, then a rifle in .243 WIN will do nicely and can double as a deer gun with the right loads - again this one is as common as flies on manure. If you expect to do battle with hordes of rampaging Visigoths, then a semi-auto or pump might be the ticket.

    C Handgun of minor caliber
    .357 Mag is best, VERY common and can also use .38 Long and.38 Special for more options. A 6" revolver is your best bet. We're talking rat gun up to power blaster here. Properly loaded, this one can do everything from dispatching vermin, to halting feral dogs that are attacking your chickens or threatening your kids - to protecting you against VERY personal human attack.

    There is much more to be said about this subject, but there are some of the basics.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 8, 2007
  5. Critter Crazy

    Critter Crazy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 19, 2007
    Binghamton, NY
    We have a shotgun and a rifle for protection from predators. We have Coyotes, foxes, wild dogs, coons, Bears ect....
     
  6. JudyMcKinn

    JudyMcKinn Chillin' With My Peeps

    699
    2
    161
    Jan 24, 2007
    SW MO
    Hubby and I have a shotgun, a .22 caliber rifle and a 22 cal. pistol. The 22 rifle is the one we use for skunks, possums, raccoons, etc. He bought the shotgun before we were married when a friend wanted him to hunt with him, but he really isn't interested in hunting, so it is very seldom used.
    The pistol, I bought when I worked at the hardware store before we married. One had to get a permit from the sheriff then, to buy a pistol. No idea what you would need to do now--we are in MO.
    I have always liked guns, and my brothers taught me to shoot when I was about 6 years old--supervised, of course. At that time, I shot rabbits and squirrels to suppliment meat at the table. Now, at age 65, I can't shoot anything unless it is threatening my chickens, or being a pest otherwise.
    But I would definately recommend a 22 rifle at the least, if you are in an area where it is legal to shoot--neighbors not close, etc.
     
  7. prariechiken

    prariechiken Chillin' With My Peeps

    652
    58
    196
    Feb 9, 2007
    Midwest
    Excellent post elderoo, very informative for those considering firearm purchase. In my opinion, a rural flock owner shouldn't be without one. Esp. here where I am, lots of cases of rabid skunks, coons, etc. as well as the hordes of healthy varmits look'n for an easy chicken dinner. No Visigoths here yet, but me thinks I spotted a Vandal scout....LOL....
     
  8. jmantoo1

    jmantoo1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    117
    0
    139
    Apr 11, 2007
    i own a shotgun and a rifle and pistols for varmits and people varmits this is a crazy world we live in [​IMG]
     
  9. cknmom

    cknmom Chillin' With My Peeps

    833
    2
    159
    Apr 10, 2007
    Dickson TN
    My husband and I have many guns. Shotguns,rifles,and handguns. Our granddaughter who we are raising, also has a rifle that she has been taught very closely how to use. We use the shotguns and rifles for hunting and protection of our animals and our property, as well as ourselves. We have badgers, coytes, mountain lions, hawks, owls and many other predators. We will not hesitate to use our handguns to protect ourselves if need be. We live in an area where law inforcement help could take sometime, especially on the weekend when their offices in our small nearby town are closed! We also use our guns for target shooting, it makes a very enjoyable afternoon for the family. I also just participated in my first shooting tournament as my husbands partner! It was a nice way to spend time together. Just make sure that you trian everyone in the home about the guns and all the saftey measures. My husband first started teaching our gd to shoot when she was 5yrs. old. She can't wait to go hunting with grandpa and shoot in her own tournaments. I feel much more able to take care of our home, animals and my gd since I have learned to shoot.
     
  10. xrayman

    xrayman Out Of The Brooder

    96
    0
    29
    Apr 4, 2007
    Central IA
    i have a ruger 10-22 (10 shot 22 caliber) for shooting the varmits. I hunt alot so i have a wide variety of guns but the 22 is good for shooting the small stuff. For home protection the 12 gauge is always loaded. it's loaded with 4 shot, which will give you a wide spread of bullets and alot of stopping power. Just remember it matters what your laws are in your state, but in iowa the perpitrator (sp?) must be inside the house or building. But a pepper shot @ 40 yards will get em moving on.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by