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Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Meca, May 31, 2016.

  1. Meca

    Meca Chillin' With My Peeps

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    right here.
    We have had cooler weathe than normal, but this last weekend it was really warm 87 plus and extremely humid.

    Sunday morning I noticed one of my hens was trying to sleep out in the run during the day. Today, I came home from work and it looked like she was trying to sleep again. When I walked up to her she looking liked she had drool down the front of chest and head head was bobbling around. I picked her up and she seems thin and had clear, watery stuff coming out her nose. I took her out of the pen and set her on the ground. She couldn't walk and had to stick a wing out as if she was trying to steady herself. She also sounds gruggly when she was breathing.

    After pulling her out I walked the pen and I had another hen who has a droopy tail and a rooster who just doesn't seem like he feels well.


    I had searched and searched. Can someone point me in the right direction?

    I wormed my chickens back in March.
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2016
  2. Meca

    Meca Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 2, 2014
    right here.
    I went out this morning the one hen has passed, but the other hen and the rooster are acting normal?
    Since I don't know if they have something I'm wondering if I should treat them for coccidiosis? And a broad spectrum of antibiotics?

    Anyone have any advice?
     
  3. gotro17

    gotro17 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm sorry for your loss! We just lost a chick to cocciodosis and her symptoms were the Amelia... Good. Luck
     
  4. Meca

    Meca Chillin' With My Peeps

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    right here.

    Thank you. I am at a loss. Not sure what I should do. I don't want to loose my chickens. From what I am reading old hens don't get coccidiosis. My hens are a year plus. So now I am even more confused on what I should do.
     
  5. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    St. Louis, MO
    It doesn't sound like coccidiosis to me. Seems to be more respiratory than digestive.
    The very best course of action would be to send the bird for necropsy to know exactly what you're dealing with - especially since you had a couple other birds affected.
    If you post what state you're in, we can give you the location and contact info for your poultry lab.

    Antibiotics IMHO are a real no-no unless you know they have a bacterial infection, which bacteria and if it is even one that can be treated with antibiotics.
    Respiratory issues can also be viral, fungal, protozoal, nutritional or environmental.

    Antimicrobial-resistant bacteria are a major threat to public health, the use of antibiotics in livestock should be kept to a minimum and only used for treating sick animals and only if you know what you are treating for. All aspects of animal husbandry should be considered in a holistic approach, to increase the chance of success.
     
    2 people like this.
  6. Meca

    Meca Chillin' With My Peeps

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    right here.
    I am located in Michigan. Like I said any help, suggestions, advice are greatly appreciated.
     
  7. Meca

    Meca Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 2, 2014
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    I am also wondering if possibly it could be mareks (chicks were purchased from the feed store. so I am sure they aren't vaccinated) ;-( or possibly boutilism because our last batch of feed they didn't mix properly and they seemed to wet chunks in it the feed. When I called the feed mill they told me it was liquid fat and everything would be ok.
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2016
  8. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Nov 23, 2010
    St. Louis, MO
    Here's your poultry lab. That would be the most economical resource for a necropsy. The quicker you can get the bird there the better.
    They may also be able to send you another direction.
    Michigan

    Diagnostic Center for Population and Animal Health
    Michigan State University
    4125 Beaumont Rd, Ste 201H
    Lansing, Michigan 48910
    Phone: 517-353-1683 Fax 517-432-5836


    Symptoms don't resemble Marek's either. With hundreds of things it could be, a necropsy is your best course of action.
    Botulism from feed issues is always possible but symptoms don't align with that either.
    I'm guessing a viral infection. But my guesses have always been wrong. I once suspected worms but a fecal sample showed no worms present but rather a clostridial bacteria.
    I suspected a bacterial infection and a necropsy showed the bird had cancer.
    I suspected Urolithiasis and a necropsy showed the bird had a heart attack.
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2016
    1 person likes this.
  9. Meca

    Meca Chillin' With My Peeps

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    right here.
    Thank you. I will call them today and see what they say.
     
  10. Meca

    Meca Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 2, 2014
    right here.
    Can you recommend what I should be doing for a holistic approach then? I use ACV in their water and garlic. Is there something else I should be doing?
     

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