What is this?~?~?~?

Gypsy07

Songster
9 Years
Feb 4, 2010
2,286
66
193
Glasgow, Scotland
Yes, dry incubation is where you incubate without adding water until lockdown. It doesn't mean you have 0% humidity, it just means that the climate where you live is already humid enough that you already have ideal humidity due to the level of natural atmospheric humidity, and you don't need to add water to raise it even higher.

Some people have to add tons of water to achieve their ideal humidity, and some people live in such humid climates that they will run an air conditioner in the room their bator is in to try and LOWER the humidity to an ideal level. Too little humidity throughout the incubation and your chicks will lose far too much moisture and could actually dry up and die before they even get to pip. I had this happen once and had a bator full of eggs with huge air cells and genuinely dried out dead chicks. It was horrible. Too much humidity and your chicks can die early, or drown in the excess fluid when they try to hatch.

'Dry' hatches probably work best in places where the atmospheric humidity is somewhere around 30-35%, and your bator can be placed in a room without central heating or air conditioning. I imagine it wouldn't work too well in very dry or very humid places...
 

youngbiddy

Songster
10 Years
Aug 2, 2009
681
7
131
North Carolina
Any hatch where the average humidity is less than 40% is considered a "dry incubation". You want to keep the minimum level at 25-30% to keep the eggs from literally drying out, though. I've been keeping mine between 30-35% because one set of my shipped eggs is a bit porous.
 
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ilovebuffs

Chirping
10 Years
Jun 26, 2009
186
0
99
Senoia, GA
I have only done dry incubation and have had excellent results. I read an article on BYC by Bill Worrell. It is very informative. See if you can do a search...if not I can post it, but it's kind of long. I recommend it. Have fun
big_smile.png
 

enggass

Crowing
10 Years
Mar 8, 2010
1,686
69
251
Mid-Coast Maine
I live in New England where the dew point and relative humidity levels are very low right now. I am using a Brinsea Oct Eco 20 with both wells filled and my humidity is between 32% and 37% depending. As Spring approaches and we are experiencing melting and more rain our humidity is rising as well as the humidity in my 'bator - slightly. I will add some paper towels/sponges at lockdown to ge the humidity up around 55%-60%...
 

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