What type of pellets for bunny litter box

Jenessa_096

Crowing
Jul 14, 2021
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Molalla, Oregon
I believe that paper bedding is edible. Its not like they're going to start chowing on it, the concern is them tasting it out of curiosity, or accidentally picking some up when they eat hay. Care Fresh paper bedding wont harm them as long as they only eat a little bit accidentally every now and then.
Okay also I’m pretty sure my bunny is pregnant! They turned 3 months old a week ago and she is showing signs of pregnancy. She is gathering a bunch of blankets and pieces of stuff and toys into her little bed. I have noticed my male he was trying to jump on her is it possible for her to be pregnant?
 

GranderTheGander

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Feb 3, 2021
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Unscented Yesterday's News is a safe choice, and you can also put hay on top of the Yesterday's News or not. Or you can just put newspaper in the bottom with a puppy pad on top and put hay on top of that. Also, either have fresh hay in the front of the box where the rabbit does not go, or a hay rack next to the box. They should not eat any dirty hay in the litter box.

P.S. What type of hay are you using? I have a Lionhead and she never gets hay stuck to her fur, as your rabbit has in the photo. You need hay with longer pieces. I use Oxbow orchard hay and timothy hay. The orchard is soft and the timothy is more coarse and good for digestion. First-cut hay is good for longhaired rabbits.
 
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Jenessa_096

Crowing
Jul 14, 2021
1,271
2,590
286
Molalla, Oregon
Unscented Yesterday's News is a safe choice, and you can also put hay on top of the Yesterday's News or not. Or you can just put newspaper in the bottom with a puppy pad on top and put hay on top of that. Also, either have fresh hay in the front of the box where the rabbit does not go, or a hay rack next to the box. They should not eat any dirty hay in the litter box.

P.S. What type of hay are you using? I have a Lionhead and she never gets hay stuck to her fur, as your rabbit has in the photo. You need hay with longer pieces. I use Oxbow orchard hay and timothy hay. The orchard is soft and the timothy is more coarse and good for digestion. First-cut hay is good for longhaired rabbits.
Well since they are 3 months old I use alfalfa hay and it is very dusty and short.
 

Jenessa_096

Crowing
Jul 14, 2021
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Molalla, Oregon
Also, these are the pellets I bought for only 3 dollars
 

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GranderTheGander

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Well since they are 3 months old I use alfalfa hay and it is very dusty and short.
I haven't fed alfalfa hay in so long that I totally forgot what it was like! 🙃 Those pellets appear to be safe for rabbits and cheap. I could get a bag at Ace Hardware, but it's $11.99 there, which isn't bad for 40 pounds, in my opinion. My only problem with wood pellets is the weight. I'm getting old and weaker! ☹️
 

Jenessa_096

Crowing
Jul 14, 2021
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Molalla, Oregon
I haven't fed alfalfa hay in so long that I totally forgot what it was like! 🙃 Those pellets appear to be safe for rabbits and cheap. I could get a bag at Ace Hardware, but it's $11.99 there, which isn't bad for 40 pounds, in my opinion. My only problem with wood pellets is the weight. I'm getting old and weaker! ☹️
I bought a 20 pound bag at Bi-mart for less than $5 bucks. Way better than a wee bag of carefresh for $11!
 

Jenessa_096

Crowing
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WHAT IS THIS?!?! Found this on my bunnies bed!! 😲 Looks like blood? I fed them beef leaves today do you think that’s what happened?
 

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GranderTheGander

Songster
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WHAT IS THIS?!?! Found this on my bunnies bed!! 😲 Looks like blood? I fed them beef leaves today do you think that’s what happened?
Looks like orange colored urine, which is not an issue. What rabbits eat can cause it. When I looked up beet leaves for rabbits, it said eating them can turn urine red, but they are safe if fed in moderation.
 

NatJ

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Okay also I’m pretty sure my bunny is pregnant! They turned 3 months old a week ago and she is showing signs of pregnancy. She is gathering a bunch of blankets and pieces of stuff and toys into her little bed. I have noticed my male he was trying to jump on her is it possible for her to be pregnant?
YES. Given what you describe, she probably is pregnant, although it would have been better for her to grow up a bit more first.

I suggest you separate the two of them for at least 35 days (that would be sometime in the middle of January.) Adjacent pens, with wire mesh between them so they can still sniff and socialize, would probably be best. The idea is to prevent mating, but not separate them far enough to be lonely. And no playtime together-- none at all, if you want to prevent mating.

Definitely make sure she has a safe place to give birth: maybe a wood nestbox and lots of hay or straw to burrow in. The box can also be metal, plastic, or probably even cardboard, but the doe definitely needs plenty of hay or straw to make her nest. The opening should be high enough that jumps up and in, rather than walking in straight. That helps keep the bunnies IN the box while they are little-- so a top opening, or one partway up on one side.

A rabbit pregnancy usually lasts 31 days, so within about 35 days from separating them you should know for sure. Having the male separate ensures that he will not breed the doe (if she is not pregnant yet), does not trample babies when they are born, and does not rebreed the doe after she gives birth. Yes, a male rabbit can rebreed the doe before you even know the babies have been born, if he is in the same pen with her.

Then, if she has not yet had a litter, think about whether you ever want them to breed. If yes, make your plans and act accordingly.

If you know already that you do not want them to breed, you can have the male neutered now, and the doe spayed after she raises the litter, or if you discover that she wasn't pregnant you can have her spayed after enough time passes that you are sure of that.
 

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