When can I put them outside??

Discussion in 'Quail' started by ssbs, Dec 2, 2010.

  1. ssbs

    ssbs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 7, 2010
    My chicks are 3 weeks old now. And over a quarter of a pound...

    They are acclimated to my 60 degree basement already. It's getting to be a pain with trying to keep the tank they are in clean. I'd like to move them outside as soon as possible. I've got a 3X6 cage with 3 hens and two roos. There are 14 chicks.

    Thanks
     
  2. BobwhiteQuailLover

    BobwhiteQuailLover Country Girl[IMG]emojione/assets/png/2665.png?v=2.

    Sep 25, 2010
    Wisconsin
    You can put them outside when they are fully feathered. Usually 6 weeks.
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2010
  3. shelleyd2008

    shelleyd2008 the bird is the word

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    Adair Co., KY
    Quote:Inside?? [​IMG]

    This time of year you want to make sure they are acclimated to the cold. Move them into a 'cold' area when they are around 4 weeks old but still give them a light. Raise the light (lower wattage) regularly to get them used to it.

    I usually don't move them outside in the winter, I'm scared to kill them [​IMG] But I did move some outside last year, though they had a 100 watt bulb in their 'house' (one side of the pen was open wire) until the temps started warming up.
     
  4. thebirdguy

    thebirdguy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 22, 2010
    Idaho Falls
    You don't say where you are located or what your outside cage situation is (other than size).. If your daily high temperature is in the 20's or lower like here in Idaho, 3 week old quail chicks acclimated to a 60 degree basement will freeze the first night outside.. If you happen to live somewhere a little warmer and/or your cage is in a shed that stays warmer, then you may be ok. What is your current outdoor temperature and expected forecast for the next month? Give us a little more information about your location and we can help you better..

    Birds can withstand lower temperatures than you would think, I have kept cockatiels and parrots outside all winter long but they have dry nestboxes to retreat to, protected pens against wind and wet, and most importantly, they gradually become acclimated over the fall months to the temperature change. It's the sudden change in temperature that will cause you the problems not the temperature itself most of the time. If it is much colder than 60 degrees outside in your cage, you may want to consider a modified brooder to gradually acclimate them to the cold..

    Good luck!
     
  5. ssbs

    ssbs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 7, 2010
    So you think it would be okay of I set a heat lamp out there?? My cage sits about 3 feet off the ground, the bottom is mesh.. The top is mesh (covered), 3 sides are 1.25" pine and the front is chicken wire.. So there is pretty much only one way for wind to blow in.

    They are comfortable in the basement right now.. They have light but it is a low watt bulb hanging high above the tank, so it doesn't provide heat. Just light.

    They are already fully feathered. the A&M's have already changed out their yellow baby feathers into white feathers.
     
  6. ssbs

    ssbs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 7, 2010
    Quote:My above post gives a bit more detail about the cage.

    I am in VA.
    The lowest temp we've had and are expecting this month is 23
     
  7. shelleyd2008

    shelleyd2008 the bird is the word

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    Adair Co., KY
    I would definitely give them some kind of heat source and it wouldn't hurt to cover their pen completely for a while...they'll get enough cold from the open bottom.
     
  8. BobwhiteQuailLover

    BobwhiteQuailLover Country Girl[IMG]emojione/assets/png/2665.png?v=2.

    Sep 25, 2010
    Wisconsin
    Quote:X2
     
  9. Rainwolf

    Rainwolf De La Menagerie

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    Aug 4, 2010
    Seattle, WA
    My Coop
    I use a old wooden toybox with a corrugated plastic roof outside for winter hatchs. They need heat and no wind at that age but as long as you keep them draft free and have heat they can go outside around that age.

    The big toybox is a solid box that I just removed lid and placed corrugated roof that allows airflow across the roof via the "wave" channels. Once outside just make sure they don't drop more then 5-10 Degrees F at any single time. If the outside temp is pretty stable I adjust the heat to reduce by 5-10 degrees every 4-5 days until they are at outside temps during day then I turn heat off for day and turn on at night. to wean off the night heat I just add a little extra time to the off heat clock every night. **I watch the temps very carefully to make sure not to drop temps to much to fast! A probe thermometer is great! just place probe under bedding under heat and always maintain that area as a even steady temp zone. If outside temps drop fast increase heat to help maintain your temp zone at the right temps

    Hope that made some sense... [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2010
  10. mhwc56

    mhwc56 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Uhhh.. you shouldn't add small /immature CHICKS to an established pen of ADULTS.....they should be full sized before they are put together...
     

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