when can they switch to grower?

rir123

In the Brooder
6 Years
Feb 23, 2013
63
0
39
I just ran out of chick starter. the chicks are about 3 weeks old are they old enough to eat grower?
 

sillycmoy

Songster
6 Years
Mar 29, 2013
1,532
70
153
Utah~Utah County
I was told they need to stay on chick start till at least 14 weeks old. But that's what the lady at the feed store stated. She said, some breeds that don't start laying till later should stay on chick start till 18 weeks. But this is what I was told at the feed store. I was planning on asking the same question when they were all around 14 weeks.
 
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lazy gardener

Crossing the Road
7 Years
Nov 7, 2012
27,615
27,051
917
CENTRAL MAINE zone 4B
I was told they need to stay on chick start till at least 14 weeks old. But that's what the lady at the feed store stated. She said, some breeds that don't start laying till later should stay on chick start till 18 weeks. But this is what I was told at the feed store. I was planning on asking the same question when they were all around 14 weeks.
I was just at the feed store, having the same discussion. there, I was told that the recommendation is to keep them on starter until 8 weeks old, then switch them to grower, which is lower protein than starter, then to start layer at POL. It may depend on the brand of product you are buying.
 

Hillschicks

Songster
7 Years
Jul 17, 2012
455
36
101
Chicks have existed since they evolved from dinosaurs.. Long before we had chick starter.. We feed starter until we run out then we move on to grower finisher.. Another bag wouldnt hurt tho
 

Demosthine

Songster
7 Years
Jun 26, 2012
1,111
140
191
Phoenix, Arizona
A far more appropriate answer is that it depends on the specific brand and type that you are getting. Some brands have a "Starter" that is meant for hatch to seven weeks, while others are made for a far larger range.

For example, I use the Purina Mills' Start & Grow Sunfresh and it is rated for hatch to laying hens. I discussed it with them and the only thing it lacks for laying hens is the additional calcium for the shell hardness, so they said you can add free-choice calcium like crushed oyster and crushed egg shell to continue using it for a mixed-age flock. Their Flock Raiser Sunfresh has the same recommendations, although it is a different formulation for owners of geese, turkeys and such. If you pull up the three feeding charts below, you'll notice that all of their Start & Grow feed is specified for ages between 16 and 20 weeks.

Nutrena Naturewise Feeding Chart
Nutrena Country Feeds Feeding Chart
Purina Mills Feeding Chart
 
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debid

Free Ranging
10 Years
Jan 20, 2011
7,560
6,916
516
middle TN
Depends on the protein %. Some grower feed is the same as chick starter but without medication for cocci. Read the label sewn into the bag seam. If it's in the 19-22% protein range, it will work. If it's more like 16%, I'd get another sack of starter.
 

ChickensRDinos

Songster
7 Years
Aug 19, 2012
2,242
240
208
Los Angeles
A far more appropriate answer is that it depends on the specific brand and type that you are getting. Some brands have a "Starter" that is meant for hatch to seven weeks, while others are made for a far larger range.

For example, I use the Purina Mills' Start & Grow Sunfresh and it is rated for hatch to laying hens. I discussed it with them and the only thing it lacks for laying hens is the additional calcium for the shell hardness, so they said you can add free-choice calcium like crushed oyster and crushed egg shell to continue using it for a mixed-age flock. Their Flock Raiser Sunfresh has the same recommendations, although it is a different formulation for owners of geese, turkeys and such. If you pull up the three feeding charts below, you'll notice that all of their Start & Grow feed is specified for ages between 16 and 20 weeks.

Nutrena Naturewise Feeding Chart
Nutrena Country Feeds Feeding Chart
Purina Mills Feeding Chart

x2 good post

It does really depend on what you are buying and what you want. The critical thing is that you NOT use a layer for young birds but a good grower could potentially be fine.

Some people want a medicated starter. If that is what you were wanting to do I would keep with a starter longer. I personally do not use a medicated feed and buy a high protein organic grower/starter feed that I actually feed to all of my birds at all life stages. Compare the labels on your starter and your grower and see what the differences are. It can vary by brand. You want high protein and very very very low calcium for chicks.

A lot of people will use a grower or flock raiser to feed their entire flock when young chicks are being broody raised so that all birds can get what they need from the same feed.
 
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Sarah22

Hatching
6 Years
Feb 9, 2013
1
0
6
x2 good post

It does really depend on what you are buying and what you want. The critical thing is that you NOT use a layer for young birds but a good grower could potentially be fine.

Some people want a medicated starter. If that is what you were wanting to do I would keep with a starter longer. I personally do not use a medicated feed and buy a high protein organic grower/starter feed that I actually feed to all of my birds at all life stages. Compare the labels on your starter and your grower and see what the differences are. It can vary by brand. You want high protein and very very very low calcium for chicks.

A lot of people will use a grower or flock raiser to feed their entire flock when young chicks are being broody raised so that all birds can get what they need from the same feed.
What % protein is the organic feed you use?
 

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