when will I see more eggs from my reds?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by rhoda_bruce, Oct 10, 2009.

  1. rhoda_bruce

    rhoda_bruce Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 19, 2009
    Cut Off, LA
    My primary breed is Rhode Island Reds and they became 5 months old on Sept 24th. At about that time I began seeing my first pullet eggs, but very few have started laying, unless they have a very good hidding place (and believe me I've looked). I have not used Layers Pellets, although I did in the past. I felt that I could keep them alive with a little grain and force them to clean my garden and bee yard of weeds and grass and weed seed as well as bugs and that could provide me with free chicken food and also supplement with table scraps. In other words, I have very cheap chickens. They look a nice size and very healthy, but I know I have sacrificed eggs due to my decisions. Still I think that the egg production should improve soon.
    Would anyone know what to expect from Rhode Island hens that aren't overly encouraged to produce eggs, but allowed free-range, for the most part?
     
  2. DIMBY

    DIMBY Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 14, 2009
    Western Colorado
    Two words: Oyster shell
     
  3. Uppity Peon

    Uppity Peon Chillin' With My Peeps

    My "RIRs" are Production Reds so they may be different from yours. Mine are very good layers at 25 weeks. I think you will see your egg count go up quickly about now.

    I have a hanging feeder full of layer pellets that they can always eat from, and they also have the run of the property all day long.
     
  4. rhoda_bruce

    rhoda_bruce Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 19, 2009
    Cut Off, LA
    Quote:I totally agree. My status with the forum is 'new egg', but actually I have done this before and quite a bit. I am just being cheap and all basic now. I am lucky for oyster shells. My farm is on an old trailer park site and chickens, being like they are, can unearth anything, including the ancient site of driveways and small streets.
     

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