Where to get true Dual Purpose breeds?

Discussion in 'Chicken Breeders & Hatcheries' started by BarredBuff, Jan 7, 2011.

  1. BarredBuff

    BarredBuff Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 6, 2009
    Well its about that time of year to order! Where in your best knowledge is best place to get true dp breeds? That brood, large, and lay lots of eggs. A breeder is out so what ever hatchery you find to be the best tell me about them, please!
     
  2. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    Forks, WA
    Sorry, but you're not going to find a decent hatchery with dual purpose breeds. The closest you MIGHT get it Sandhill's Dorkings, but there's no guarantee on them actually being meaty. I don't see what is so wrong with getting from breeders. There are quite a few who offer chick orders.
     
  3. HBuehler

    HBuehler Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 30, 2009
    Lebanon TN
    You don't state which breeds your looking for..many breeds are not broody and when they are broody they don't lay eggs so which is it that your wanting broody or lots of eggs? Why is a breeder out of the question? Your in KY and I know KY and surrounding States offer lots of high quality breeders and breeding stock that are dual purpose breeds.
     
  4. BarredBuff

    BarredBuff Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Im looking for Australorps, New Hampshire Reds, and Buff Orpingtons.
     
  5. Wild Trapper

    Wild Trapper Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 1, 2011
    Ohio
    Why is a hatchery out? I've bought chicks from a hatchery in Cincinnati, Oh. a couple times with good healthy results. they where shipped on a Sunday and delivered on Monday - next day. They have all three breeds you mentioned above. I can give you the link or phone number if you wish.
     
  6. BarredBuff

    BarredBuff Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I would like to do a hatchery. Maybe Mt Healthy............
     
  7. booker81

    booker81 Redneck Tech Girl

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    If you want really good quality, I'd suggest just advertising on here or on Craigslist for the breeds you want with the characteristics you want. I know even in this area, there are some larger breeders who are already starting to offer chicks, or are taking orders for chicks with good qualities (**must not order, must not order, gah!!! I need more chicks like I need a hole in the head!**)
     
  8. Wild Trapper

    Wild Trapper Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 1, 2011
    Ohio
    Quote:I would like to do a hatchery. Maybe Mt Healthy............

    That's the one, not to advertise, as it might not be allowed, but I've had good luck using them. Call 'em and talk to them, they are friendly and helpful, at least they were for me. I'd like to get some more EEs for my flock, but from a different source next time, maybe to mix the gene pool. If not this year, maybe next.
     
  9. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Feb 2, 2009
    Northwest Arkansas
    I'll throw out my opinion. Take it for what it is worth.

    That surprised me a bit. According to Henderson Breed Chart, New Hampshires can be broody. I thought since they were derived from RIR they would not be. I know, strain is important.

    http://www.ithaca.edu/staff/jhenderson/chooks/chooks.html

    I think you just take pot luck with hatcheries. They are probably going to be pretty good layers since their breeding flocks are there to lay eggs for incubators. I think broodiness is a little more problematic. Their flocks are to lay eggs for incubators, not to hatch the eggs themselves. That said, my Australorps from Cackle go broody. Size is something else that is problematic. The hatchery breeding stock is not selected for size. They select for egg laying ability that pretty much (certainly not to show standards) conform to color, configuration, comb, skin color, and other traits of the breed. Note I said pretty much, not that they are rigorous in that selection.

    I think you also take pot luck with breeders. Some people raise from hatchery stock and call themselves breeders, althoughg they are not real good as selecting for the standards of perfection. If they are honest about that, I have no problem with that. Some people that call themselves breeders are dishonest. That is a risk you take. Not all breeders that know what they are doing and are honest select for the traits you want. The advantage to buying from a breeder is that you can talk to them about what traits they are breeding for. Many will be honest and tell you whether or not their strain will meet your needs. I think a big advantage of buying from a breeder is that most of them are passionate about what they are doing and really care about their birds. By talking to them you can often tell which is which.

    I think with the traits you are looking for, you can buy from a hatchery and get a flock as good as most backyard flocks were 50 years ago. They should lay pretty well, they will get big enough to eat, and, well, not all our backyard flock went broody every year. You really only need a few.

    If you can find a breeder that breeds for the traits you want, you will be better off going to them. I want to be pretty clear on that. The better stock you get to start with, the better your flock will be. But for your goals, a hatchery is probably good enough.
     
  10. Wild Trapper

    Wild Trapper Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 1, 2011
    Ohio
    The broodiest hen I ever had was a Golden Laced Wyandotte. It came from Mt Healthy. But, I have also had other breed hens go broody as well, all came from either there or TSC which the local TSC buys their chicks from that same hatchery at least some of the time. Broodiness seems to be better in some breeds than others, but since I have my own incubator, I don't look for that in a hen. I want hens that lay well and will also make good eating. We will butcher young birds before they reach full maturity because they make better eating. Old birds are usually put in the pressure cooker and then the meat picked from the bones to be frozen or canned for later use. Wife hates to do that so she tries to sell them on CL or give them away.
     

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