Which medicine should I use?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by sara1226, Jun 27, 2016.

  1. sara1226

    sara1226 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a sneezing chicken and I'm not sure which medication I should try. The only symptom is a raspy sneeze. No bubbly eyes and no discharge from the nostrils. I tried 3 days of soluble tylan (1 tsp in half gallon water), and I tried 2 days of Baytril ( .25 ml twice daily). There has been no improvement. Her energy level is good, she is eating good, there's just this pesky sneeze! She is separated from the flock.

    The only thing that changed a little is the sneeze has went from a raspy congested sound to more of a vocal sneeze.

    Before this happened my daughter was putting a dish of water out with ice and berries in it to help keep the chickens cool because it was hot. But the berries were sinking to the bottom. I told her to stop because if the chickens tried to get the berries from the deep water they might get water into their nostrils. Maybe my advice was too late? Could this be an infection and not a virus if something got lodged in the airway??

    I also have tetracycline on hand. Any advice is really appreciated!!!! Please!!!!
     
  2. sara1226

    sara1226 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 15, 2015
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    Anyone with ideas or advice would be appreciated. Thanks....
     
  3. chickengeorgeto

    chickengeorgeto Overrun With Chickens

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    Injectable Trylan50 or maybe Trylan200 under the skin of the neck and in the left breast is what I recommend and if this treatment doesn't produce results.... well consider the ax.
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    If the disease did not respond to Tylan or Baytril, then I would stop any more because it is probably a birus called infectious bronchitis which antibiotics do not affect. They can help prevent secondary bacterial infections common in respiratory diseases, but viruses have to run their course over time--and in the case of IB, that usually is around 3 weeks. It is common for IB to run through the whole flock eventually. It can make them carriers for up to a year, so don't add or hatch new birds to your flock, and don't give any away for at least a year after recovery. Testing (or a necropsy) is the only surefire way to confirm what disease you have going on, and having given them antibiotics can make your test results useless or not accurate.
     

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