Why no washing/disinfecting eggs?

SundownWaterfowl

Crowing
11 Years
Mar 16, 2008
9,764
64
293
Southern Columbia County NY
I was most of my hatching eggs, with hot water and dawn dishwashing liquid. Almost all of my hatches from my eggs have been 100% this year. I see no problem with washing hatching eggs, and have seen no ill effects from washing them. I also spray down the eggs several times during incubation with brinsea incubation disinfectant, especially if they are eggs that I have purchased from another breeder.
 

BlacksheepCardigans

Songster
9 Years
Oct 11, 2010
507
44
139
Southeast NH
Quote:The problem is - that already happened. When the egg was laid warm, and it cooled, it drew whatever was on the nest into itself. Disinfection can't do anything about that, which is why smeared eggs are usually discarded at a hatchery. They KNOW those are already contaminated.

You are supposed to wash/disinfect with hot water specifically because of the way warm/cool eggs work. Washing or dipping in hot (not scalding, but much warmer than the eggs) solution doesn't pull the stuff into the egg. It causes the egg to expand inside and helps to push bad stuff out through the pores.

What the hatcheries consider good is over 90% hatch rate. So if we've got a lower rate on non-shipped eggs, and we know we've got the incubator under control and the ventilation is good, we could theoretically get a substantially better rate by disinfecting.
 

SarahIrl

Songster
9 Years
May 4, 2010
877
6
131
West Cork, Ireland
I also raise mine organically so will refuse to use any chemicals on them, but that is a moot point here. I will not change the way I treat my eggs, and am more than happy with the health and and hatch rate I get. I am running a school program next year nationwide into hatching and will be laying out guidelines for schools up and down the country. I won't be asking any of them to wash eggs.

ALso, chaging temps on any thing encourages bacterial bloom to accelerate, wich is why you keep meat cool until you cook it, not take it our of the fridge for 2 hours a day and then re-cool it. That will make it go off quicker. If it cools once post lay and only then reheats for incubation, it saves on extra bacterial cultures forming.
 
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BlacksheepCardigans

Songster
9 Years
Oct 11, 2010
507
44
139
Southeast NH
Quote:What you're doing is very close to the way the commercial hatcheries do and you seem to be having similar success. Which is what I would expect. insert little mental happy-jumping dude.

Anybody can incubate any way they want, but I hate to see people being warned against washing when it not only doesn't hurt but could help a lot.
 
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blefky

life in the yard
9 Years
Mar 18, 2010
878
7
131
stamford, ct
I guess we all have our own philosophical/practical perspectives on this subject, and the diverse views are one of the things I like about BYC. Food for thought, and lots of learning. I love it!
 

A.T. Hagan

Don't Panic
12 Years
Aug 13, 2007
5,379
187
303
North/Central Florida
Everybody has to make up their own minds about these things. Wash or don't wash. Sanitize or don't sanitize. For hatching eggs I both wash and sanitize mine. For table eggs I wash them, but don't ordinarily sanitize them.
 

Dipsy Doodle Doo

ODD BIRD
13 Years
Jan 11, 2007
7,178
65
306
Aiken, South Carolina 29801
My Coop
My Coop
Hi! I don't 'wash / disinfect' eggs for hatching here. I haven't seen the need for it. Most eggs are laid clean in the nestboxes. Sometimes, I have muddy runs and the hens track mud back to the clean nestboxes (and a hen will wallow her muddy feet all over the egg she 'just laid'). The mucked-up ones, I set here and they grow and hatch just fine. Cleaning the hatcher IN BETWEEN every hatch is (I think) important.
What I'm talking about is the fact that we lose a lot of hatching eggs, we TALK about the fact that bacteria got in there (every time somebody talks about a blood ring it's in connection to bacterial growth)

My experience has been that blood-rings are not associated with dirty eggs --- unless they are ridiculously nasty with clumps of feces and bedding stuck to the eggs (like I got from a member here) and then you can expect the eggs to start and stop. There is a lot of available *yuck* to start growing there (and you bet I took the incubator and hatcher apart and bleached all the parts)
I keep the regular dirty eggs here and HATCH them myself. And they are hatchable.

Lisa​
 

muddstopper

Songster
11 Years
Aug 23, 2008
680
8
141
Murphy NC
My personal experiences with washed eggs are I will never do again. I placed 96 washed eggs in the top tray of my incubator, the next wk I placed 96 more non-washed eggs in the second tray and the next wk, I added another 96 eggs to the bottom tray. When I went to remove the top tray of washed eggs, I found oozing and dripping down on the lower trays. Non3 of the first 96 washed eggs developed or hatched, the second tray was also contaminated and thrown out, the bottom tray only hatched like 6 or 8 chicks. The bator had to be dis-assembled and completely disinfected. I lost almost 300 eggs, about 4 or 5 wks of incubating time, and a customer that I was hatching eggs for.

I'll wipe off excessively dirty eggs, but washing I wont do ever again.
 
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