1. Come check out hundreds of awesome coop pages (and a few that need suggestions) in our 2018 Coop Rating Project!

Working on New Varieties, How often do you Cull?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by AWChickens, Mar 19, 2009.

  1. AWChickens

    AWChickens Songster

    239
    1
    121
    Sep 16, 2008
    Bloomington, IN
    I've been working for about a year on a long term poultry project, which will take another 1-2 years to complete. My F1 group was small and I was able to keep most of them, but now I'm hatching out my F2 group this year- and am hatching many more, in hopes of finding a few with the traits I want- F3 will probably be even worse, and then I should be able to start to streamline. So my question to all of you out there working on special projects- is what do you do with your project surplus? Do you place them, or do you cull? Since my F2 group will be crossing two different breeds, I'm going to end up with quite a few chicks who don't have the characteristics that I want- and will just be (probably odd looking) mutt birds. I've heard a lot of people say that they cull all the ones they don't keep, but I just can't imagine doing that....but I'm curious if there's any kind of standard practice amongst you genetic tinkerers?
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2009

  2. Appytaz

    Appytaz Songster

    389
    0
    129
    Jul 18, 2008
    Central Florida
    put them on craigslist and give them away! plenty of people with take mutt chickens.
     
  3. Im going to be starting a buff silkie project, and I will have to wait around 8 months before deciding who to cull and who to use. You could also try listing the culls on craigslist.


    what does F1, and F2 mean? What does the F stand for? I might be stupid but I cant figure it out [​IMG]
     
  4. AWChickens

    AWChickens Songster

    239
    1
    121
    Sep 16, 2008
    Bloomington, IN
    So I'm not the only one that gives them away? I just can't stand to cull if I don't have to. I started with a (P) parental generation, and then those first chicks are called a filial generation- which just means they are a generation, or part of a sequence of generations that follows the parents. F stands for filial, and F1 just means this is the first generation to follow the parents. Since I hatched out the parental generation myself- the whole thing takes forever. Some of the people around here that breed just cull everything that doesn't look the way they want it to, and I don't really want to do that. I thought I'd see what other people do- and then make up my mind.
     
  5. JHitchcock

    JHitchcock Chirping

    16
    0
    75
    Jan 4, 2009
    If you dont mind my asking... what is it that your trying to achieve? I always found selective breeding and things of the such interesting.
     
  6. Huny

    Huny Songster

    491
    1
    129
    Nov 14, 2008
    Sunny Southern Arizona
    I am going to start working on some columbian bantam cochins (yes, I know it's been done, but want to try for myself) and wondering where you find info about genetics? anyone have a link? I will be giving away quite a few chicks I'm sure also.
     
  7. Chicktastic

    Chicktastic In the Brooder

    84
    1
    29
    Mar 10, 2009
    Chapel Hill, NC
    People are always looking for chickens on craigslist. You might even be a ble to make a few $ on the hens. The roostters might be another matter. But I do know of a few people who like the roosters are lawn ornaments and pasture maintenance.
     

  8. AWChickens

    AWChickens Songster

    239
    1
    121
    Sep 16, 2008
    Bloomington, IN
    I'm trying to get a decent line of mottled houdans going. As far as genetics info, there's lots of good stuff on here- just try searching for previous posts. I've also gotten information from breed club sites and some veterinary journals.
     
  9. NYREDS

    NYREDS Crowing

    5,644
    396
    303
    Jan 14, 2008
    Cull means remove from the flock not necessarily kill. I have a nearby small animal auction-that's where all my culls go.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by