worming chickens - need a little help

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by McGoo, Oct 6, 2010.

  1. McGoo

    McGoo Chillin' With My Peeps

    I think I need to worm my chickens - I've got an old gal who is lethargic. I plan to move her to a separate pen to check out her poop.
    I'm told if one has it they all do... so if she does, that means deworming them all?
    What about 1 month olds?
    What about 5 month olds?

    Is there any deworming method to eliminate worms once they're in force? I do use DE all around, but my guys free range and who knows. I'm told that the homeopathic stuff is a preventative, but won't kill a bad investation.

    Please help. I want to do right for them, keep it natural, if possible... and get them all cleaned out and healthy before winter.

    Thanks
     
  2. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    I wouldnt worm chickens under 9 months old. There shouldnt be a heavy wormload at all. "Old gal" is a relative term. If she's over 9 months old, is it possible she could be eggbound? In any case, you can worm her and the others if they're old enough.
     
  3. Tartannik

    Tartannik Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I didn't realise you shouldn't worm birds under 9 moths!!
    What about the ones that have been with the older ones, surely they need wormed at the same to prevent them re-infecting???
     
  4. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Quote:I've never mixed in young pullets with older hens because IMO it would be too much picking/pecking going on and the younger pullets would suffer at the hands of the older ones. I've always had the 2 groups seperated and I've wormed the older hens as necessary but not the pullets. Dont get me wrong, if you want to worm all of them at once, go for it. It was only my recommendation that the younger ones most likely wouldnt need worming by virtue of their young age and most likely not having an infestation.
     
  5. rcentner

    rcentner Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I deworm the entire flock all at once. Chickens can have parasites from day 1, so I would deworm something under 9 mos old but not under 3 months old (just to be safe, not that you couldn't). Unless you deworm them all on the same schedule they will keep passing the parasites back and forth faster. The parasites are on the ground and unless you "rotate the pasture" and disinfect the coop regularly, they will once again need deworming. I keep a schedule like what is done for horse dewormng. You always assume they have parasites and only decrease the load so that they don't become a problem.

    deworming all at once will leave you without the dilema of whose eggs are safe to consume...none of them for atleast 2 weeks, although some people say longer (and I, myself, eat the eggs anyway but dont sell them or give them away and I haven't been sick or died yet)

    good luck!
     
  6. McGoo

    McGoo Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:I've never mixed in young pullets with older hens because IMO it would be too much picking/pecking going on and the younger pullets would suffer at the hands of the older ones. I've always had the 2 groups seperated and I've wormed the older hens as necessary but not the pullets. Dont get me wrong, if you want to worm all of them at once, go for it. It was only my recommendation that the younger ones most likely wouldnt need worming by virtue of their young age and most likely not having an infestation.

    Over the last 2 years I use my broody hens to hatch and raise the little chicks. I separate them for about 3 - 4 days and then they all go out in the yard to free range. The little chicks stay with momma for a bit, but by 2 mos old they're pretty much on their own. I have found this to work very well regarding getting picked/pecked on. The little ones understand from the very beginning and it's quite peaceful. And my roo is very protective of the little ones.

    The problem I have is separating the young ones so that they don't drink the medicated water. That's my problem, but do-able.[​IMG]

    Thanks
     

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