Would like to attract crows as hawk deterrent

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by jjthink, Mar 18, 2008.

  1. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD

    I would have to agree, it will very alot geographically how your wildlife acts. Crows in the city will steal your lunch right off the table when you turn your back to them... while the crows at home won't even come down to land on the buildings.
     
  2. Just becareful doing this, you may be surprised to know that crows will also kill your peeps if you have freerangers. I lost a how hatch or banties to a set of crows last summer. There was nothing the momma could do to save them and she was nearly killed in the process. If I see a crow I shoot it.

    I have two pair of perquine falcons that live near our house as well has a huge female horned owl adn a redtail or two. They were here before I was so I respect them. In four years of having chickens I lost my first to a flying preditory bird this winter when the weather was so bad. Even though the owl that we watched take it lives in a pine tree less then 50 yards from the chicken coops and overlooking our house. I guess they have enough feed that they don't need to stop by the local kfc (the chicken coops) for a meal. The crows on the other hand are a nusence.

    My bigger concrens when it comes to perditors is coyotes. I never had a problem with them, never feared them, until I moved in here with my hubby. Only to learn what he had told me for years was true. That most coyotes where we live run with stray dogs. It makes them nolonger afarid of humans or human activites. You want something scary go out at 4 am to chase off what ever is at your garage just to find it's a really ticked off stray dog. And I don't me stray like it ran off for a few days I mean, dragging a chain that is half growed into it's neck and looks like a bag of bones stray.
     
  3. jjthink

    jjthink Crowing

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    Thanks everybody - I appreciate hearing about your experiences with crows, successful or not.....

    Crows are indeed resourceful!

    I don't have chicks, so thankfully no crow worries there. And I do have a very diligent roo who is a total worry wort, always looking up!

    Yesterday I saw 2 hawks low and near - they seemed together, something I haven't seen before - maybe juveniles. I should know for sure but there was a glare and I couldn't be sure, other than knowing they were indeed hawks. I would like to give my dear roo some assistance. Since crows make a racket when they see a hawk, the extra warning may come in handy. Roo's lady friend, hen Annie, is absolutely oblivious to danger. La di da, happy as a lark, leaves all the worry to BJ roo and explores to her heart's content. Their run is covered - my concern is their free range time, which they truly live for! I try to watch as closely as I can, so they do indeed live.

    The crows don't seem interested in the birdseed I have out and about - everything else is though - little birdies, and of course the chickens!

    Once in awhile, a ton of crows stop in and have a meeting, but not that often....
    JJ
     
  4. chicknmania

    chicknmania Crowing

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    Yesterday I heard a bunch of crows harassing a hawk and chased it towards the woods behind our house. It was interesting as Dazzle and his group of hens were up by the house; they came running at top speed into the garage and the whole group of them piled up and crashed into the door leading into the house!
     
  5. Wolf-Kim

    Wolf-Kim Songster

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    I usually put a chicken egg or two on the posts of the horse pasture in the backyard. The eggs are usually put out about 8:00 am and are usually gone within the hour. They'll make off with the whole egg. You just have to know the nature of a crow, it is natural for them to fly around to other birds nests and steal eggs and chicks.

    They won't stop a hawk all the time, but you'll sure know when one's there. I've been inviting a flock of crows for about a week and they are beginning to understand the invitation. I looked out this afternoon and they were perched on the posts of the horse pasture and drinking out of the trough.

    -Kim
     
  6. Quote:Hawks like most preditory birds mate for life. If you seen a pair and not one or three they probably we a mated pair not a set of Juvies. Usually three is mom dad and child. And a single is a mate hunting alone, or a juvie without a mate yet. The crows would deffently alert that there is a preditor bird in the area if that is what you are looking for. Just take caution if you have loose peeps. The biggest fight between hawks and crows is a crow will steal and kill hawk chicks from nests as the parents are away hunting. Hawks primary food is small rodents and rabbits. Same with owls. They will kill a chicken if they have an easy enough opptunity but they will not go out of their way to do so if other food is avalible. Crows are scavengers, and will only kill things that are few weak, and small like peeps. They are not made for hunting.

    Now a falcon is another story, they feed mostly on smaller then themselves flying birds. Doves and Pigions are a favorite meal. But also kill rodents and rabbits, ect. Hawks will also kill smaller birds but they are not as percisely engineered by nature to kill another bird in mid flight. Just remember in most places ALL preditory brids are protected by law, meaning you can not kill or harm them without chance of jail time.

    And that a preditory bird will only kill your chickens if there is nothing else for it to eat, such as squrels, mice and moles, rabbits ect. These are its natural food sorce not your chickens. You have just as high a chance for a food deprived preditory bird to kill your cat as you do a chicken. Just something to think about.
     
  7. jjthink

    jjthink Crowing

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    The pair is back today. A boatload of crows would come in handy right now! I am a wreck worrying about my feathered friends - letting them out for a little this afternoon because they are going nuts in the run and because I am working at home today - the highway to work is shut down. But there's no concentrating to be done when I can hear those hawks. So I think it'll be time to bribe them back into the run in a few minutes. It's pouring out anyway and I'm out there standing in the rain with the chickens. We're all nuts. Just hope the hawk pair doesn't take up residence.
    JJ
     
  8. GwenFarms

    GwenFarms Songster

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    I don't know if they will help with the hawks, but I do know that my bil loves crows. He goes to the bread store and gets the bread that is being thrown out. He spreads it all around his place and you just can't imagine the crows that are there. It can be deafening. I would not go the roadkill route. He likes birds of all kinds and has been known to drag deer carcasses, off a nearby road, up on a hill behind his place. That attracts buzzards. He enjoys watching them, but I don't know if you want them hanging around your coop ! [​IMG]

    Just to add, I don't remember seeing any hawks around his place, so maybe your on to something with the crows.
     
  9. GwenFarms

    GwenFarms Songster

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    Quote:I don't know about this. I've told my story on here before about the hawk that flew down the aisle of a friend's barn, into his indoor round pen, with him standing right there and killed his guinea. There are HUNDREDS of squirrels around this man's barn and plenty of other prey. There is a big open field outback that I'm sure is full of mice and rabbits. My son hunts over there alot and can't make a dent in the squirrels. I would definetly try to protect my birds if I knew hawks were in the area regardless of your prey/predator ratio.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2008
  10. mommy9994

    mommy9994 Songster

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    well, you can have some of my crows! they are after my chickens' corn
     

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