Wrapping for freezing

CowgirlMama

Chirping
8 Years
Feb 23, 2011
188
0
99
Baker City, Oregon
We are butchering and processing 20 or so chickens and a few ducks this weekend, and I'm wondering the best way to wrap them to freeze them. We are planning to age them in the fridge for 24 hrs then freeze them. And I think at least a few of them we'll brine in salt water for 24hrs. I would like to keep most of them whole, and cut a few into quarters (depending on carcass size). Freezer bags? Wrap in freezer paper? Thanks for the help!
 
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booker81

Redneck Tech Girl
9 Years
Apr 18, 2010
1,929
119
183
Mid-MI
I like to vacuum seal everything - my poor Foodsaver has had one heck of a workout over the years.

I've also used freezer zip top bags, and have wrapped in plastic then in freezer paper. Either one works well (I just like the ease of packing with vacuum sealing.


The main thing is to keep air out, whatever the method you use.
 

Bluff Country Chicken

In the Brooder
8 Years
Feb 3, 2011
51
0
39
SE MN
I just butchered 40 birds this past weekend and used poultry shrink bags I bought from Herrick Kimball. Go on Google and search poultry shrink bags. They cost about 50 cents each, but you end up with a good looking, well-sealed bird for the freezer. They're supposed to last in the freezer quite a while longer. They were sent to me via Priority Mail, so you might not need to postpone your processing at all.
 

fresheggs4u

Songster
12 Years
Dec 6, 2007
202
0
129
i have tried freezer bags and even doubled them. The best results that I have are using the vaccum sealed package. It's great.

One other comment about the aging. I have aged some of my birds 24 hours and others I have aged longer. Here's what I discovered. 24 hours is not to my liking. I don't have refrigerator space for the batches of 20-30 birds. So I pack them in ice water - un bagged. (if that is a word). If you will try to move a leg of the bird and it does move easy then rigor is still there. My best meat has been from birds ageds three days. On the third day the legs move freely. I them tuck them in the breast skin and lay them out on towels for about 30 minutes to dry off. Then I bag them and seal. Best meat we have ever had. The 24 hours meat was mostly wasted. No one wanted to eat it.

Just my thoughts!
 

Saltysteele

Songster
8 Years
Apr 10, 2011
624
8
121
MI
your enemy with freezing is air.

my dad is a butcher, so has a professional cryovac machine. it literally collapses the chicken.

however, you can eat a steak that has been frozen for 2 years cryovac'd, and you wouldn't be able to tell the difference between it and one frozen yesterday.

get as much air out as you can, seal the bag well, and preferably put in a freezer with manual defrost (the constant defrosting will alter any frozen food's quality)
 

Arielle

Crowing
8 Years
Feb 19, 2011
16,722
642
411
Massachusetts, USA
fresheggs4u wrote:

i have tried freezer bags and even doubled them. The best results that I have are using the vaccum sealed package. It's great.

One other comment about the aging. I have aged some of my birds 24 hours and others I have aged longer. Here's what I discovered. 24 hours is not to my liking. I don't have refrigerator space for the batches of 20-30 birds. So I pack them in ice water - un bagged. (if that is a word). If you will try to move a leg of the bird and it does move easy then rigor is still there. My best meat has been from birds ageds three days. On the third day the legs move freely. I them tuck them in the breast skin and lay them out on towels for about 30 minutes to dry off. Then I bag them and seal. Best meat we have ever had. The 24 hours meat was mostly wasted. No one wanted to eat it.

Good to know. I did in 6 geese in Feb and they were so tough, I roasted and then stewed them! Tasted great, good flavor, just too tough.

Saltysteele

your enemy with freezing is air.

my dad is a butcher, so has a professional cryovac machine. it literally collapses the chicken.

however, you can eat a steak that has been frozen for 2 years cryovac'd, and you wouldn't be able to tell the difference between it and one frozen yesterday.

get as much air out as you can, seal the bag well, and preferably put in a freezer with manual defrost (the constant defrosting will alter any frozen food's quality)

THanks for that info. My chest freezers hold our lamb for years-- sometime 5 or 6 years. THe build bup of frost on the inside walls tell me why the meat lasts so well. Also the meat is wrapped in plastic bags and then in butcher paper. I have a new appreciation for my butcher!​
 

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