Yet another lighting question.......

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by khable, Sep 7, 2007.

  1. kstaven

    kstaven Crowing

    5,927
    58
    293
    Jan 26, 2007
    BC, Washington Border
    No reason to feel strange about suggestions and comments. I enjoy to give and take of information and theories. In reality, I don't think you would find two of us on this board that do things exactly the same way. So that always leaves the door open to learn something new.

    Many times people don't agree on how to do things. But, more often than not, we forget that geography plays a big role in how and why we do what we do.

    I do raise my chickens for my own eggs and groceries and sell quite a number to others also.

    Selling more chicks to other show type breeders also. Word seems to getting around that my birds not only fit the standard but lay well. Show birds with breeding issues is all to common around here.

    Love your commentary and expansion on the subject.

    The rubber strips are only for the day. I have drop doors for night time. So no worries there.

    With the swing to more small hold farms we are currently seeing and the demand for chickens increasing to either decorate the farm or become part of a rotational grazing system, I do wonder where the next 10 or so years is going to take us.

    I do know up here there are more people looking for birds that not only look good but can actually survive the climate, lay eggs, and potentially become dinner. So there is a definate resurgence in demand for heritage breeds. Sexlink sales are dropping off. I have been watching this trend for the past 3 or 4 years and it is still building.

    So I have to ask. Where does the trend appear to be headed in your neck of the woods?
     
  2. Davaroo

    Davaroo Poultry Crank

    5,517
    88
    308
    Feb 4, 2007
    Leesville, SC
    With the swing to more small hold farms we are currently seeing and the demand for chickens increasing to either decorate the farm or become part of a rotational grazing system, I do wonder where the next 10 or so years is going to take us.

    Just where you say it is going, I should think. There will be a steady increase in "decorative" chickens, into which group Ill place the chicken pet crowd. On the other hand, our "threat mentality" ND rising energy costs will see more and more people trying their hand at chickens on a small scale, especially with a growing impetus in the smaller cities and towns.

    So I have to ask. Where does the trend appear to be headed in your neck of the woods?
    Well, I live in Dixie. We don't have the xtremes of weather you do and so chickens have always been considered little more than scrubs on the small farm. They are expected to fend for themselves for the most part. There are a few who know what they are about (dipsy-doodle-doo lives down the road), but not as many as one would hope for. Change comes slow here.

    There is a HUGE industry in commercial poultry in my region, which does little for the small flock awareness we'd like to see. There are more than a few who are into "gamebirds," as well, despite legal restrictions. With the surge in latino populations, this is increasing.

    What I see with small holders here is an increasing awareness of care for the chicken, mostly in better housing efforts. There still seems to be little desire to treat the chicken as a valued commodity, though. This is "hog and hominy country," after all.
    Utility breeds are popular with tradtional farm birds being the ones kept on the small hold. BR's, RIR's, and Sex-links seem to top the list.​
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by: