New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Tylan 200 injection schedule

post #1 of 43
Thread Starter 

Hello!  While new to this forum (actually, any forum for that matter) we have raised chickens for about 8 years; small flock of 12-20 mixed breed birds for eggs and enjoyment.

We have a 2.5 year old Silver Laced Wyandotte with respiratory problems (a cold).  I have spent a few hours scouring the internet and have come back with three or four frequency recommendations for Tylan 200 injections for respiratory problem and thought maybe I should join a forum and ask some fellow poultry people their experience.

I am (fairly) confident through my chicken health book and the internet that the correct dosage for this sick bird is .5 cc.

As far as schedule/frequency, I have seen online (each repeatedly):
- 1 injection followed by a follow-up injection 48 hours later
- 1 injection am and another injection pm for 3 days not more than 5 days
- 1 injection am and another injection pm for 7 days not more than 14 days

They are SO different I'm not even comfortable taking an average smile

The sick Wyandotte had some respiratory issues a few months ago (winter) and we gave her 1 injection followed by another 48 hours later at that time.  She improved to almost better, but never seemed to 100% completely beat this thing.  Whether its the stress of summertime heat/humidity or just reoccurance, she's getting worse again.

We gave her an injection 2 days ago and she seems to be 'stable' once again.

I have heard that chickens can build an immunity to antibiotics just like people.

Lastly at that same time in winter when the wyandotte was sick we had two others with colds; 1 injection followed by another 48 hours later did the trick for them.

SO, I sure would appreciate any recommendations you might have for me.  I was planning on giving her another shot tonight and seeing where it goes; but I'm wondering if some of you out there feel that after it not doing the trick for this chicken in the winter if I should try one of the other longer treatment options?

and LASTLY smile we purchased the Tylan 200 a few months ago (Dec 2010) and it has been capped in the refridgerator since.  Still ok?

Thank you!

post #2 of 43
Thread Starter 

Hi guys -- can you see this post?  Thinking maybe I'm not doing this right -- thx

post #3 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark_Kaiser 

Hi guys -- can you see this post?  Thinking maybe I'm not doing this right -- thx


We can see the post. The reason why you're not getting responses is that not many people use tylan 200 injectable. Most use tylan 50 injectable or tylan soluable. The dosages and times are more widely available in the forum for tylan 50.
It appears that you've pretty much answered your own question as well. If it's working for you, continue to dose accordingly. Keep in mind that tylan 200 is more potent than tylan 50. Dose once with it, then once again in 48 hours as you've been doing.
Chickens dont get colds like humans, it is a specific disease. Bacterial diseases can and do build resistance to antibiotics in time. Antibiotics have no effect on virusus. The problem with chronic respiratory diseases (CRD) are that antibiotics mask the symtoms but dont cure the disease in chickens. The chickens will remain carriers for life.
If the tylan 200 eventully becomes ineffective, look into denegard. It is for swine but can be used in chickens. There is no resistance to it nor withdrawal. Type "denegard" in the BYC search box and read up on it. I've read alot of good things about it, it can be purchased from QC Supply.
The expiration date on tylan should be located on the box that it came in. Keeping it refridgerated is a good idea. Good luck.


     Most people have no clue...Forewarned is Forearmed

Reply


     Most people have no clue...Forewarned is Forearmed

Reply
post #4 of 43

I use tylan 200 for my chickens but have found that if given in injections it can make abcess or necrotic place in tissue.  It is better to give it orally if at all possible.  I give a big hen 1 cc and a small chicken 1/2 cc orally everyday for 5 days.  I also give 1 cc procaine penicillin under the skin on half grown chicken to hen size for respiratory issues at same time I give tylan.  1/2cc of penicillin for smaller chicken.  But I only give penicillin every 3 to 4 days.  Amoxicillin caps 250mg work well with the chickens for respiratory infections also.  I am sure someone will come on and say something different but this has worked for me this year. 
  The tylan is broad sprectrum and covers many bacteria.  The penicilin covers alot of gram positives that tylan can miss.  I had few chickens this last year that no antibiotic worked on and lost them but was afraid it was viral.  It is always best to isolate the sick chicken from rest of group of chickens so as not to spread the bug.  I would also check if it is older hen that is sick for mites.  Mites suck the blood from the chicken and predipose them to catch illnesses. Mites can also spread respiratory infections in your chickens too. I use seven powder on them for this.  When the go to bed and are on the roost i just go around ruffling some feathers and sprinkle powder on them.  I am far from a vet but those are some things I would do,

post #5 of 43

Usually an injectable antibiotic stores well in refridgerator.  I always check expiration date but usually when it expires it looses potency and does not work like it should it doesn't get like poison or anything just not as strong.  You cannot keep sulfa injectables in refriderator but tylan is not sulfa med.    I am sure your antibiotic is still good.  Always look at medication when you draw it up in syringe and pay attention to if it looks ok.  If it has changed color or is cloudy the medication isn't any good anymore.

post #6 of 43

Regarding immunity to drugs.  What happens is the bacteria become smart.  They say this antibiotic is killing us so they build up stronger coatings or change so that antibiotic isn't getting them anymore.  So it has nothing to do with the chicken becoming restistant to the medication it is the bacteria becoming smart.  Then you may have to change antibiotics.  But to ensure you are not just barely getting her over it then she comes down with it again make sure you give her antibiotic for the full 5 days.  That will give her chance to get over this infection.  Feed her special things to help make her feel better.  I like to feed things that are high in protein cause that helps them heal.  boiled eggs, raw liver slivers(helps for anemia), hotdogs, or something she likes. 
I don't get on here alot I work and take care of chickens so dont have alot of time.  But hopefully I helped you.  I have raised chickens about 25 years and tylan is old medication but good one.

post #7 of 43

I've used Tylan 200 with great success.  But, I use it orally per my vet that specializes in poultry.    They weighed my hen at 6.6 lbs then told me to give her a dosage of .23 cc (ml) once a day.  If you give them too much it can damage their kidneys and liver.    I had to administer this dose for over a week.   It wasn't for CRD.   Joint infection and then the other hen weighed the same for a coyote attack.   Tylan 200 is concentrated as Dawg suggested.  Good luck!

post #8 of 43
Thread Starter 

Thank you all very much!  Was so happy to see replies to my post -- 

1 Lively Chick -- Only reason we went with injections is that on a thread on found elsewhere on the internet they were all recommending injections vs. provided in their drinking water; but I didn't even know that orally was an option.  If that's what a poultry vet recommends, that's great by me.  To confirm, orally as in fed directly into the throat using a 'soft' syringe the kind used for hand feeding?

Dawg -- We have a couple Poultry Health books and also looked extensively online, but it appears that respiratory infections are very hard to identify?  Or can you recommend a good source?  Sick chicken appears to be eating and drinking normally, but sneezes and seems to wheeze on and off.  When we had super hot weather a few days last week her wheezing was elevated and constant; thought we were going to lose her.  We did not seperate her; will do that in the future.

Wayne and Kim -- thanks for the mite connection --- could definately be connected we are in the middle of battling a mite problem; we've throroughly powerwashed, cleaned and sprayed the entire coop with Poultry Protector.  Replaced the roost boards, removed the straw in the nest boxes, and dusted the entire coop with DE.  Afterwards we coated all infected legs with vaseline.  Did we miss anything?  I'm thinking of another coat of vaseline yet.

Really appreciate your help guys -- while raised in the country we weren't raised on a farm and we struggle sometimes with what to do to provide the best care for our feathered flock. 

- Mark & Cari

post #9 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark_Kaiser 

Thank you all very much!  Was so happy to see replies to my post -- 

1 Lively Chick -- Only reason we went with injections is that on a thread on found elsewhere on the internet they were all recommending injections vs. provided in their drinking water; but I didn't even know that orally was an option.  If that's what a poultry vet recommends, that's great by me.  To confirm, orally as in fed directly into the throat using a 'soft' syringe the kind used for hand feeding?

Dawg -- We have a couple Poultry Health books and also looked extensively online, but it appears that respiratory infections are very hard to identify?  Or can you recommend a good source?  Sick chicken appears to be eating and drinking normally, but sneezes and seems to wheeze on and off.  When we had super hot weather a few days last week her wheezing was elevated and constant; thought we were going to lose her.  We did not seperate her; will do that in the future.

Wayne and Kim -- thanks for the mite connection --- could definately be connected we are in the middle of battling a mite problem; we've throroughly powerwashed, cleaned and sprayed the entire coop with Poultry Protector.  Replaced the roost boards, removed the straw in the nest boxes, and dusted the entire coop with DE.  Afterwards we coated all infected legs with vaseline.  Did we miss anything?  I'm thinking of another coat of vaseline yet.

Really appreciate your help guys -- while raised in the country we weren't raised on a farm and we struggle sometimes with what to do to provide the best care for our feathered flock. 

- Mark & Cari


Hi Mark, Dawg has an excellent suggestion for orally.  Just gently pull the wattles and drip the solution...you don't want it to go down the airway.  It really works and is the easiest way to administer!  THanks, Dawg!!!   Take the needle off whengiving it orally.   Also, very important to get the proper weight....If you give too little it's ineffective in you give too much it can damage their organs.  It also takes a little longer to treat b/c it takes longer to absorb.  My tylan 200 experience was for A joint infection and the other was a dirty predator bite.  THe chicken doctor, Peter Brown has another protocol for CRD... Call firststatevetsupply if you're interested in that.  Good luck!   I didn't pay attention to where you lived but here in NW GA we have a wonderful Poultry vet if you're interested.  They are very reasonable with their fees for chickens, too!

post #10 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1livelychick 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark_Kaiser 

Thank you all very much!  Was so happy to see replies to my post -- 

1 Lively Chick -- Only reason we went with injections is that on a thread on found elsewhere on the internet they were all recommending injections vs. provided in their drinking water; but I didn't even know that orally was an option.  If that's what a poultry vet recommends, that's great by me.  To confirm, orally as in fed directly into the throat using a 'soft' syringe the kind used for hand feeding?

Dawg -- We have a couple Poultry Health books and also looked extensively online, but it appears that respiratory infections are very hard to identify?  Or can you recommend a good source?  Sick chicken appears to be eating and drinking normally, but sneezes and seems to wheeze on and off.  When we had super hot weather a few days last week her wheezing was elevated and constant; thought we were going to lose her.  We did not seperate her; will do that in the future.

Wayne and Kim -- thanks for the mite connection --- could definately be connected we are in the middle of battling a mite problem; we've throroughly powerwashed, cleaned and sprayed the entire coop with Poultry Protector.  Replaced the roost boards, removed the straw in the nest boxes, and dusted the entire coop with DE.  Afterwards we coated all infected legs with vaseline.  Did we miss anything?  I'm thinking of another coat of vaseline yet.

Really appreciate your help guys -- while raised in the country we weren't raised on a farm and we struggle sometimes with what to do to provide the best care for our feathered flock. 

- Mark & Cari


Hi Mark, Dawg has an excellent suggestion for orally.  Just gently pull the wattles and drip the solution...you don't want it to go down the airway.  It really works and is the easiest way to administer!  THanks, Dawg!!!   Take the needle off whengiving it orally.   Also, very important to get the proper weight....If you give too little it's ineffective in you give too much it can damage their organs.  It also takes a little longer to treat b/c it takes longer to absorb.  My tylan 200 experience was for A joint infection and the other was a dirty predator bite.  THe chicken doctor, Peter Brown has another protocol for CRD... Call firststatevetsupply if you're interested in that.  Good luck!   I didn't pay attention to where you lived but here in NW GA we have a wonderful Poultry vet if you're interested.  They are very reasonable with their fees for chickens, too!


I agree with dawg53 [he has a warehouse of wonderful information] about TYLAN50 vs.tylan200.  I would not use TYLAN@)) for IM, orally yes, I scoured for info in doseaging and came up with .1.5ml LF and .1ml banty. I use insulin syringes [cuz I have them]. once a day for 4 days if the symptoms still are there continue for 3 more days to 7 days max.  If you girl has CRD she does have it for life.  BUT the problem could maybe just be from heat/mites/humidity/etc... I use Frontlineor Advantage for bug control [man it works so good].  Every bird gets one drop on the skin on the base of the tail once a month.  All the other things you did disinfect/DE are all right on.
I have also used AGRIMYCIN with great results for controling outbreaks of CRD but that is also IM for 4 days max. I have a roo with crd so I am familiar with it. Hope all my babbl
eing is helpful...

California State Rep for the American Serama Association / President of the Pacific Coast Serama Club

 

Slave & defender for: 1 horse, the love of my life AGF/OEGB banty roo Pharow, a crazy menagerie of seramas,1 banty NN hen and lots of special needs birdies!  I LOVE my feathered kids.  AND, DERPERALLA is my ALL TIME FAVORITE HEROINE!

Reply

California State Rep for the American Serama Association / President of the Pacific Coast Serama Club

 

Slave & defender for: 1 horse, the love of my life AGF/OEGB banty roo Pharow, a crazy menagerie of seramas,1 banty NN hen and lots of special needs birdies!  I LOVE my feathered kids.  AND, DERPERALLA is my ALL TIME FAVORITE HEROINE!

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home